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The social relations model for count data : an exploration of intergenerational co-activity within families

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Abstract
The social relations model (SRM) is typically used to identify sources of variance in interpersonal dispositions in families. Traditionally, it uses dyadic measurements that are obtained from a round-robin design, where each family member rates each other family member. Those dyadic measurements are mostly considered to be continuous, but we, however, wilt discuss how the SRM can be adapted to count dyadic measurements. Such SRM for count data can be formulated in the SEM-framework by viewing it as a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), but it can also be defined in the multilevel framework. These two frameworks result in equivalent models of which the parameters can be estimated using maximum likelihood estimation or a Bayesian approach. We perform a simulation study to compare the performance of those two estimators. As an illustration, we consider intergenerational co-activity data from a block design and contrast family dynamics between non-divorced families and stepfamilies.
Keywords
STRUCTURAL EQUATION MODELS, LINEAR MIXED MODELS, COVARIANCE MATRICES, PARENTS, PACKAGE, LEISURE, Bayesian analysis, family social relations model, perceived co-activity, levels of analysis, count data

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MLA
Loncke, Justine, et al. “The Social Relations Model for Count Data : An Exploration of Intergenerational Co-Activity within Families.” METHODOLOGY-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RESEARCH METHODS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES, vol. 15, no. 4, 2019, pp. 157–74, doi:10.1027/1614-2241/a000178.
APA
Loncke, J., Cook, W. L., Neiderhiser, J. M., & Loeys, T. (2019). The social relations model for count data : an exploration of intergenerational co-activity within families. METHODOLOGY-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RESEARCH METHODS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES, 15(4), 157–174. https://doi.org/10.1027/1614-2241/a000178
Chicago author-date
Loncke, Justine, William L. Cook, Jenae M. Neiderhiser, and Tom Loeys. 2019. “The Social Relations Model for Count Data : An Exploration of Intergenerational Co-Activity within Families.” METHODOLOGY-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RESEARCH METHODS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 15 (4): 157–74. https://doi.org/10.1027/1614-2241/a000178.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Loncke, Justine, William L. Cook, Jenae M. Neiderhiser, and Tom Loeys. 2019. “The Social Relations Model for Count Data : An Exploration of Intergenerational Co-Activity within Families.” METHODOLOGY-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RESEARCH METHODS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 15 (4): 157–174. doi:10.1027/1614-2241/a000178.
Vancouver
1.
Loncke J, Cook WL, Neiderhiser JM, Loeys T. The social relations model for count data : an exploration of intergenerational co-activity within families. METHODOLOGY-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RESEARCH METHODS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES. 2019;15(4):157–74.
IEEE
[1]
J. Loncke, W. L. Cook, J. M. Neiderhiser, and T. Loeys, “The social relations model for count data : an exploration of intergenerational co-activity within families,” METHODOLOGY-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RESEARCH METHODS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 157–174, 2019.
@article{8695152,
  abstract     = {{The social relations model (SRM) is typically used to identify sources of variance in interpersonal dispositions in families. Traditionally, it uses dyadic measurements that are obtained from a round-robin design, where each family member rates each other family member. Those dyadic measurements are mostly considered to be continuous, but we, however, wilt discuss how the SRM can be adapted to count dyadic measurements. Such SRM for count data can be formulated in the SEM-framework by viewing it as a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), but it can also be defined in the multilevel framework. These two frameworks result in equivalent models of which the parameters can be estimated using maximum likelihood estimation or a Bayesian approach. We perform a simulation study to compare the performance of those two estimators. As an illustration, we consider intergenerational co-activity data from a block design and contrast family dynamics between non-divorced families and stepfamilies.}},
  author       = {{Loncke, Justine and Cook, William L. and Neiderhiser, Jenae M. and Loeys, Tom}},
  issn         = {{1614-1881}},
  journal      = {{METHODOLOGY-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RESEARCH METHODS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES}},
  keywords     = {{STRUCTURAL EQUATION MODELS,LINEAR MIXED MODELS,COVARIANCE MATRICES,PARENTS,PACKAGE,LEISURE,Bayesian analysis,family social relations model,perceived co-activity,levels of analysis,count data}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{4}},
  pages        = {{157--174}},
  title        = {{The social relations model for count data : an exploration of intergenerational co-activity within families}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/1614-2241/a000178}},
  volume       = {{15}},
  year         = {{2019}},
}

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