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Digital issue movements: Predicting online and offline climate activism

(2021)
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Abstract
In recent years, changes have occurred not only in how citizens engage in political life, but also in what they engage (Ekström & Sveningsson, 2019). Scholars have drawn attention to the fluid, personalized and creative forms of political participation that are often enabled by social media (Theocharis, 2015). In addition, the emergence of single issue movements and cause oriented politics embeds perfectly into the logic of connective action, where digital media allow citizens to adapt certain issues to their personal experiences, if deemed relevant (Bennett & Segerberg, 2012; Kahne et al., 2016). As little research has been concerned with unraveling the predictors of both online and offline participation within the same single issue movement, this paper focusses on the case of the worldwide climate strikes in 2019. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to test whether (1) different forms of political efficacy, issue involvement and motivations for online self-expression are associated with two types of political engagement on Facebook, and (2) political efficacies and issue involvement are associated with offline political participation regarding the climate issue. Data from a paper and pencil survey among 689 teenagers indicate that different political efficacies (social media, internal and cause-oriented collective efficacy) might influence different forms of political action in different ways. Furthermore, issue involvement in terms of climate change concern was predictive of both offline and online forms of climate-related participation. Finally, disseminating information proved to be an important motivator of online political expression.
Keywords
Political participation, Climate activism, Social media, Political efficacy, Issue involvement

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Waeterloos, Cato, et al. Digital Issue Movements: Predicting Online and Offline Climate Activism. 2021.
APA
Waeterloos, C., Walrave, M., & Ponnet, K. (2021). Digital issue movements: Predicting online and offline climate activism. Presented at the Etmaal van de Communicatiewetenschap.
Chicago author-date
Waeterloos, Cato, Michel Walrave, and Koen Ponnet. 2021. “Digital Issue Movements: Predicting Online and Offline Climate Activism.” In .
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Waeterloos, Cato, Michel Walrave, and Koen Ponnet. 2021. “Digital Issue Movements: Predicting Online and Offline Climate Activism.” In .
Vancouver
1.
Waeterloos C, Walrave M, Ponnet K. Digital issue movements: Predicting online and offline climate activism. In 2021.
IEEE
[1]
C. Waeterloos, M. Walrave, and K. Ponnet, “Digital issue movements: Predicting online and offline climate activism,” presented at the Etmaal van de Communicatiewetenschap, 2021.
@inproceedings{8692770,
  abstract     = {{In recent years, changes have occurred not only in how citizens engage in political life, but also in what they engage (Ekström & Sveningsson, 2019). Scholars have drawn attention to the fluid, personalized and creative forms of political participation that are often enabled by social media (Theocharis, 2015). In addition, the emergence of single issue movements and cause oriented politics embeds perfectly into the logic of connective action, where digital media allow citizens to adapt certain issues to their personal experiences, if deemed relevant (Bennett & Segerberg, 2012; Kahne et al., 2016). As little research has been concerned with unraveling the predictors of both online and offline participation within the same single issue movement, this paper focusses on the case of the worldwide climate strikes in 2019. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to test whether (1) different forms of political efficacy, issue involvement and motivations for online self-expression are associated with two types of political engagement on Facebook, and (2) political efficacies and issue involvement are associated with offline political participation regarding the climate issue. 

Data from a paper and pencil survey among 689 teenagers indicate that different political efficacies (social media, internal and cause-oriented collective efficacy) might influence different forms of political action in different ways. Furthermore, issue involvement in terms of climate change concern was predictive of both offline and online forms of climate-related participation. Finally, disseminating information proved to be an important motivator of online political expression.}},
  author       = {{Waeterloos, Cato and Walrave, Michel and Ponnet, Koen}},
  keywords     = {{Political participation,Climate activism,Social media,Political efficacy,Issue involvement}},
  language     = {{und}},
  title        = {{Digital issue movements: Predicting online and offline climate activism}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}