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The impact of emotions on romantic judgments : sequential effects in a speed-dating study

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Abstract
How do our feelings impact the romantic judgments and decisions we make? In a speed-dating context, where people have to judge potential romantic partners sequentially, we investigated whether and how participants' prior affective state guided romantic desire toward and actual choice for an interaction partner. We found evidence for contrast effects, meaning that romantic judgments contrasted with the affective states participants were in at the start of a new interaction. The more positive (excited, interested, or happy) participants felt after one interaction partner, the less attracted they were toward a new interaction partner, and the more negative they felt (irritated or bored), the more attracted they were. The effect of negative emotions (NEs) was primarily visible in men, for whom more prior NEs even increased the chance of choosing an interaction partner at the end of the evening. The effect of positive emotions (PEs), however, had faded away when people chose their date at the end. Additional analyses revealed that specific emotions showed differential effects on romantic desire and actual choice and that contrast effects were mediated but not fully explained (at least in the case of PEs) by desire toward the previous interaction partner.
Keywords
DECISION-MAKING, MOOD, ASSIMILATION, SATISFACTION, ATTRACTION, MEDIATION, EXPOSURE, MODEL, 1ST, SEX, Dating, emotion, feelings, judgment and decision-making, romantic, attraction

Citation

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MLA
Sels, Laura, et al. “The Impact of Emotions on Romantic Judgments : Sequential Effects in a Speed-Dating Study.” JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS, vol. 36, no. 8, 2019, pp. 2437–54, doi:10.1177/0265407518789288.
APA
Sels, L., Ceulemans, E., Pe, M., & Kuppens, P. (2019). The impact of emotions on romantic judgments : sequential effects in a speed-dating study. JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS, 36(8), 2437–2454. https://doi.org/10.1177/0265407518789288
Chicago author-date
Sels, Laura, Eva Ceulemans, Madeline Pe, and Peter Kuppens. 2019. “The Impact of Emotions on Romantic Judgments : Sequential Effects in a Speed-Dating Study.” JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS 36 (8): 2437–54. https://doi.org/10.1177/0265407518789288.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Sels, Laura, Eva Ceulemans, Madeline Pe, and Peter Kuppens. 2019. “The Impact of Emotions on Romantic Judgments : Sequential Effects in a Speed-Dating Study.” JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS 36 (8): 2437–2454. doi:10.1177/0265407518789288.
Vancouver
1.
Sels L, Ceulemans E, Pe M, Kuppens P. The impact of emotions on romantic judgments : sequential effects in a speed-dating study. JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS. 2019;36(8):2437–54.
IEEE
[1]
L. Sels, E. Ceulemans, M. Pe, and P. Kuppens, “The impact of emotions on romantic judgments : sequential effects in a speed-dating study,” JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS, vol. 36, no. 8, pp. 2437–2454, 2019.
@article{8688912,
  abstract     = {How do our feelings impact the romantic judgments and decisions we make? In a speed-dating context, where people have to judge potential romantic partners sequentially, we investigated whether and how participants' prior affective state guided romantic desire toward and actual choice for an interaction partner. We found evidence for contrast effects, meaning that romantic judgments contrasted with the affective states participants were in at the start of a new interaction. The more positive (excited, interested, or happy) participants felt after one interaction partner, the less attracted they were toward a new interaction partner, and the more negative they felt (irritated or bored), the more attracted they were. The effect of negative emotions (NEs) was primarily visible in men, for whom more prior NEs even increased the chance of choosing an interaction partner at the end of the evening. The effect of positive emotions (PEs), however, had faded away when people chose their date at the end. Additional analyses revealed that specific emotions showed differential effects on romantic desire and actual choice and that contrast effects were mediated but not fully explained (at least in the case of PEs) by desire toward the previous interaction partner.},
  author       = {Sels, Laura and Ceulemans, Eva and Pe, Madeline and Kuppens, Peter},
  issn         = {0265-4075},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS},
  keywords     = {DECISION-MAKING,MOOD,ASSIMILATION,SATISFACTION,ATTRACTION,MEDIATION,EXPOSURE,MODEL,1ST,SEX,Dating,emotion,feelings,judgment and decision-making,romantic,attraction},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {2437--2454},
  title        = {The impact of emotions on romantic judgments : sequential effects in a speed-dating study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0265407518789288},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2019},
}

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