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The institutional stabilization of philosophy of science and its withdrawal from social concerns after the Second World War

Fons Dewulf (UGent)
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Abstract
In this paper, I criticize the thesis that value-laden approaches in American philosophy of science were marginalized in the 1960s through the editorial policy at Philosophy of Science and funding practices at the National Science Foundation. I argue that there is no available evidence of any normative restriction on philosophy of science as a domain of inquiry which excluded research on the relation between science and society. Instead, I claim that the absence of any exemplary, professional philosopher who discussed the relation between science and society sufficed to narrow the focus of philosophers of science, given the institutional stabilization of the domain within professional philosophy from 1959 onwards.
Keywords
Value-free ideal, Philosophy of Science Association, National Science Foundation, Richard Rudner, logical empiricism, HISTORY

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MLA
Dewulf, Fons. “The Institutional Stabilization of Philosophy of Science and Its Withdrawal from Social Concerns after the Second World War.” BRITISH JOURNAL FOR THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY, 2021, pp. 1–19, doi:10.1080/09608788.2020.1848794.
APA
Dewulf, F. (2021). The institutional stabilization of philosophy of science and its withdrawal from social concerns after the Second World War. BRITISH JOURNAL FOR THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1080/09608788.2020.1848794
Chicago author-date
Dewulf, Fons. 2021. “The Institutional Stabilization of Philosophy of Science and Its Withdrawal from Social Concerns after the Second World War.” BRITISH JOURNAL FOR THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1080/09608788.2020.1848794.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Dewulf, Fons. 2021. “The Institutional Stabilization of Philosophy of Science and Its Withdrawal from Social Concerns after the Second World War.” BRITISH JOURNAL FOR THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY: 1–19. doi:10.1080/09608788.2020.1848794.
Vancouver
1.
Dewulf F. The institutional stabilization of philosophy of science and its withdrawal from social concerns after the Second World War. BRITISH JOURNAL FOR THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY. 2021;1–19.
IEEE
[1]
F. Dewulf, “The institutional stabilization of philosophy of science and its withdrawal from social concerns after the Second World War,” BRITISH JOURNAL FOR THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY, pp. 1–19, 2021.
@article{8685218,
  abstract     = {{In this paper, I criticize the thesis that value-laden approaches in American philosophy of science were marginalized in the 1960s through the editorial policy at Philosophy of Science and funding practices at the National Science Foundation. I argue that there is no available evidence of any normative restriction on philosophy of science as a domain of inquiry which excluded research on the relation between science and society. Instead, I claim that the absence of any exemplary, professional philosopher who discussed the relation between science and society sufficed to narrow the focus of philosophers of science, given the institutional stabilization of the domain within professional philosophy from 1959 onwards.}},
  author       = {{Dewulf, Fons}},
  issn         = {{0960-8788}},
  journal      = {{BRITISH JOURNAL FOR THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY}},
  keywords     = {{Value-free ideal,Philosophy of Science Association,National Science Foundation,Richard Rudner,logical empiricism,HISTORY}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{1--19}},
  title        = {{The institutional stabilization of philosophy of science and its withdrawal from social concerns after the Second World War}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09608788.2020.1848794}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}

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