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Using CRISPR/Cas9 genome modification to understand the genetic basis of insecticide resistance : Drosophila and beyond

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  • SuperPests (Innovative tools for rational control of the most difficult-to-manage pests (super pests) and the diseases they transmit)
Abstract
Chemical insecticides are a major tool for the control of many of the world's most damaging arthropod pests. However, their intensive application is often associated with the emergence of resistance, sometimes with serious implications for sustainable pest control. To mitigate failure of insecticide-based control tools, the mechanisms by which insects have evolved resistance must be elucidated. This includes both identification and functional characterization of putative resistance genes and/or mutations. Research on this topic has been greatly facilitated by using powerful genetic model insects like Drosophila melanogaster, and more recently by advances in genome modification technology, notably CRISPR/Cas9. Here, we present the advances that have been made through the application of genome modification technology in insecticide resistance research. The majority of the work conducted in the field to date has made use of genetic tools and resources available in D. melanogaster. This has greatly enhanced our understanding of resistance mechanisms, especially those mediated by insensitivity of the pesticide target-site. We discuss this progress for a series of different insecticide targets, but also report a number of unsuccessful or inconclusive attempts that highlight some inherent limitations of using Drosophila to characterize resistance mechanisms identified in arthropod pests. We also discuss an experimental framework that may circumvent current limitations while retaining the genetic versatility and robustness that Drosophila has to offer. Finally, we describe examples of direct CRISPR/Cas9 use in non-model pest species, an approach that will likely find much wider application in the near future.
Keywords
Insecticide resistance, Drosophila melanogaster, CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing, TARGET-SITE RESISTANCE, GATED CHLORIDE CHANNEL, 2-SPOTTED SPIDER-MITE, TETRANYCHUS-URTICAE, SODIUM-CHANNEL, POINT MUTATION, RYANODINE RECEPTOR, DIAMONDBACK MOTH, FUNCTIONAL VALIDATION, BLOCKER INSECTICIDES

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Douris, Vassilis, et al. “Using CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Modification to Understand the Genetic Basis of Insecticide Resistance : Drosophila and Beyond.” PESTICIDE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY, vol. 167, 2020, doi:10.1016/j.pestbp.2020.104595.
APA
Douris, V., Denecke, S., Van Leeuwen, T., Bass, C., Nauen, R., & Vontas, J. (2020). Using CRISPR/Cas9 genome modification to understand the genetic basis of insecticide resistance : Drosophila and beyond. PESTICIDE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 167. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pestbp.2020.104595
Chicago author-date
Douris, Vassilis, Shane Denecke, Thomas Van Leeuwen, Chris Bass, Ralf Nauen, and John Vontas. 2020. “Using CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Modification to Understand the Genetic Basis of Insecticide Resistance : Drosophila and Beyond.” PESTICIDE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY 167. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pestbp.2020.104595.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Douris, Vassilis, Shane Denecke, Thomas Van Leeuwen, Chris Bass, Ralf Nauen, and John Vontas. 2020. “Using CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Modification to Understand the Genetic Basis of Insecticide Resistance : Drosophila and Beyond.” PESTICIDE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY 167. doi:10.1016/j.pestbp.2020.104595.
Vancouver
1.
Douris V, Denecke S, Van Leeuwen T, Bass C, Nauen R, Vontas J. Using CRISPR/Cas9 genome modification to understand the genetic basis of insecticide resistance : Drosophila and beyond. PESTICIDE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 2020;167.
IEEE
[1]
V. Douris, S. Denecke, T. Van Leeuwen, C. Bass, R. Nauen, and J. Vontas, “Using CRISPR/Cas9 genome modification to understand the genetic basis of insecticide resistance : Drosophila and beyond,” PESTICIDE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY, vol. 167, 2020.
@article{8681844,
  abstract     = {{Chemical insecticides are a major tool for the control of many of the world's most damaging arthropod pests. However, their intensive application is often associated with the emergence of resistance, sometimes with serious implications for sustainable pest control. To mitigate failure of insecticide-based control tools, the mechanisms by which insects have evolved resistance must be elucidated. This includes both identification and functional characterization of putative resistance genes and/or mutations. Research on this topic has been greatly facilitated by using powerful genetic model insects like Drosophila melanogaster, and more recently by advances in genome modification technology, notably CRISPR/Cas9. Here, we present the advances that have been made through the application of genome modification technology in insecticide resistance research. The majority of the work conducted in the field to date has made use of genetic tools and resources available in D. melanogaster. This has greatly enhanced our understanding of resistance mechanisms, especially those mediated by insensitivity of the pesticide target-site. We discuss this progress for a series of different insecticide targets, but also report a number of unsuccessful or inconclusive attempts that highlight some inherent limitations of using Drosophila to characterize resistance mechanisms identified in arthropod pests. We also discuss an experimental framework that may circumvent current limitations while retaining the genetic versatility and robustness that Drosophila has to offer. Finally, we describe examples of direct CRISPR/Cas9 use in non-model pest species, an approach that will likely find much wider application in the near future.}},
  articleno    = {{104595}},
  author       = {{Douris, Vassilis and Denecke, Shane and Van Leeuwen, Thomas and Bass, Chris and Nauen, Ralf and Vontas, John}},
  issn         = {{0048-3575}},
  journal      = {{PESTICIDE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY}},
  keywords     = {{Insecticide resistance,Drosophila melanogaster,CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing,TARGET-SITE RESISTANCE,GATED CHLORIDE CHANNEL,2-SPOTTED SPIDER-MITE,TETRANYCHUS-URTICAE,SODIUM-CHANNEL,POINT MUTATION,RYANODINE RECEPTOR,DIAMONDBACK MOTH,FUNCTIONAL VALIDATION,BLOCKER INSECTICIDES}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{9}},
  title        = {{Using CRISPR/Cas9 genome modification to understand the genetic basis of insecticide resistance : Drosophila and beyond}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1016/j.pestbp.2020.104595}},
  volume       = {{167}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}

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