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The human microbiome in relation to cancer risk : a systematic review of epidemiologic studies

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Abstract
The microbiome has been hypothesized to play a role in cancer development. Because of the diversity of published data, an overview of available epidemiologic evidence linking the microbiome with cancer is now needed. We conducted a systematic review using a tailored search strategy in Medline and EMBASE databases to identify and summarize the current epidemiologic literature on the relationship between the microbiome and different cancer outcomes published until December 2019. We identified 124 eligible articles. The large diversity of parameters used to describe microbial composition made it impossible to harmonize the different studies in a way that would allow meta-analysis, therefore only a qualitative description of results could be performed. Fifty studies reported differences in the gut microbiome between patients with colorectal cancer and various control groups. The most consistent findings were for Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, and Peptostreptococcus being significantly enriched in fecal and mucosal samples from patients with colorectal cancer. For the oral microbiome, significantly increased and decreased abundance was reported for Fusobacterium and Streptococcus, respectively, in patients with oral cancer compared with controls. Overall, although there was a large amount of evidence for some of these alterations, most require validation in high-quality, preferably prospective, epidemiologic studies.
Keywords
Epidemiology, Oncology, BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID, MUCOSA-ASSOCIATED MICROBIOTA, ARYL-HYDROCARBON RECEPTOR, HUMAN GUT MICROBIOME, FUSOBACTERIUM-NUCLEATUM, INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA, GASTRIC MICROBIOTA, PANCREATIC-CANCER, ORAL MICROBIOTA, POTENTIAL ROLE

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MLA
Huybrechts, Inge, et al. “The Human Microbiome in Relation to Cancer Risk : A Systematic Review of Epidemiologic Studies.” CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION, vol. 29, no. 10, 2020, pp. 1856–68, doi:10.1158/1055-9965.epi-20-0288.
APA
Huybrechts, I., Zouiouich, S., Loobuyck, A., Vandenbulcke, Z., Vogtmann, E., Pisanu, S., … Michels, N. (2020). The human microbiome in relation to cancer risk : a systematic review of epidemiologic studies. CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION, 29(10), 1856–1868. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.epi-20-0288
Chicago author-date
Huybrechts, Inge, Semi Zouiouich, Astrid Loobuyck, Zeger Vandenbulcke, Emily Vogtmann, Silvia Pisanu, Isabel Iguacel, et al. 2020. “The Human Microbiome in Relation to Cancer Risk : A Systematic Review of Epidemiologic Studies.” CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION 29 (10): 1856–68. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.epi-20-0288.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Huybrechts, Inge, Semi Zouiouich, Astrid Loobuyck, Zeger Vandenbulcke, Emily Vogtmann, Silvia Pisanu, Isabel Iguacel, Augustin Scalbert, Iciar Indave, Vitaly Smelov, Marc J. Gunter, and Nathalie Michels. 2020. “The Human Microbiome in Relation to Cancer Risk : A Systematic Review of Epidemiologic Studies.” CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION 29 (10): 1856–1868. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.epi-20-0288.
Vancouver
1.
Huybrechts I, Zouiouich S, Loobuyck A, Vandenbulcke Z, Vogtmann E, Pisanu S, et al. The human microbiome in relation to cancer risk : a systematic review of epidemiologic studies. CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION. 2020;29(10):1856–68.
IEEE
[1]
I. Huybrechts et al., “The human microbiome in relation to cancer risk : a systematic review of epidemiologic studies,” CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION, vol. 29, no. 10, pp. 1856–1868, 2020.
@article{8680858,
  abstract     = {{The microbiome has been hypothesized to play a role in cancer development. Because of the diversity of published data, an overview of available epidemiologic evidence linking the microbiome with cancer is now needed. We conducted a systematic review using a tailored search strategy in Medline and EMBASE databases to identify and summarize the current epidemiologic literature on the relationship between the microbiome and different cancer outcomes published until December 2019. We identified 124 eligible articles. The large diversity of parameters used to describe microbial composition made it impossible to harmonize the different studies in a way that would allow meta-analysis, therefore only a qualitative description of results could be performed. Fifty studies reported differences in the gut microbiome between patients with colorectal cancer and various control groups. The most consistent findings were for Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, and Peptostreptococcus being significantly enriched in fecal and mucosal samples from patients with colorectal cancer. For the oral microbiome, significantly increased and decreased abundance was reported for Fusobacterium and Streptococcus, respectively, in patients with oral cancer compared with controls. Overall, although there was a large amount of evidence for some of these alterations, most require validation in high-quality, preferably prospective, epidemiologic studies.}},
  author       = {{Huybrechts, Inge and Zouiouich, Semi and Loobuyck, Astrid and Vandenbulcke, Zeger and Vogtmann, Emily and Pisanu, Silvia and Iguacel, Isabel and Scalbert, Augustin and Indave, Iciar and Smelov, Vitaly and Gunter, Marc J. and Michels, Nathalie}},
  issn         = {{1055-9965}},
  journal      = {{CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION}},
  keywords     = {{Epidemiology,Oncology,BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID,MUCOSA-ASSOCIATED MICROBIOTA,ARYL-HYDROCARBON RECEPTOR,HUMAN GUT MICROBIOME,FUSOBACTERIUM-NUCLEATUM,INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA,GASTRIC MICROBIOTA,PANCREATIC-CANCER,ORAL MICROBIOTA,POTENTIAL ROLE}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{10}},
  pages        = {{1856--1868}},
  title        = {{The human microbiome in relation to cancer risk : a systematic review of epidemiologic studies}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.epi-20-0288}},
  volume       = {{29}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}

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