Advanced search
1 file | 361.59 KB Add to list

The contribution of school safety to weight-related health behaviors for transgender youth

(2020) JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENCE. 78. p.33-42
Author
Organization
Abstract
Introduction: The aim of the present study is to examine gender identity disparities in different kinds of weight-related health behaviors, including physical activity, participation in physical education at school, and healthy and unhealthy eating habits, and to investigate the relationship between school safety and such behaviors in a sample of transgender and non-transgender students. Method: We analyzed a statewide sample of 31,609 students (M-age = 14.04, SD = 1.70; 1.1% transgender). We used multilevel regression models to examine the interactive effects of gender identity and perceptions of school safety on the 4 different outcome variables (physical activity, physical education, healthy and unhealthy eating habits). All models included student- and school-level characteristics as controls. Results: Findings indicated that transgender students, when compared to non-transgender students, reported (a) feeling less safe at school; (b) more physical activity, but less participation in physical education at school; and (c) both more healthy as well as unhealthy eating behaviors. Adjusted regression models showed a significant interaction between gender identity and perceived school safety on healthy eating behaviors; simple slopes indicated that transgender students have healthier eating behaviors when the school context is perceived as safe compared to those who perceived the school as less safe. Conclusions: School interventions are needed to improve school safety for transgender youth and to reduce gender identity-related disparities in healthy eating and physical activity. Research implications and limitations are discussed.
Keywords
PHYSICAL-EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS, GENDER IDENTITY DISORDER, BODY-IMAGE, CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE, EATING-DISORDERS, YOUNG-PEOPLE, DISPARITIES, OBESITY, RISK, GAY, Transgender students, School safety, Healthy eating behaviors, Physical, activity, Gender identity

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 361.59 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Pistella, Jessica, et al. “The Contribution of School Safety to Weight-Related Health Behaviors for Transgender Youth.” JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENCE, vol. 78, 2020, pp. 33–42, doi:10.1016/j.adolescence.2019.12.001.
APA
Pistella, J., Ioverno, S., Rodgers, M. A., & Russell, S. T. (2020). The contribution of school safety to weight-related health behaviors for transgender youth. JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENCE, 78, 33–42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2019.12.001
Chicago author-date
Pistella, Jessica, Salvatore Ioverno, Melissa A. Rodgers, and Stephen T. Russell. 2020. “The Contribution of School Safety to Weight-Related Health Behaviors for Transgender Youth.” JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENCE 78: 33–42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2019.12.001.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Pistella, Jessica, Salvatore Ioverno, Melissa A. Rodgers, and Stephen T. Russell. 2020. “The Contribution of School Safety to Weight-Related Health Behaviors for Transgender Youth.” JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENCE 78: 33–42. doi:10.1016/j.adolescence.2019.12.001.
Vancouver
1.
Pistella J, Ioverno S, Rodgers MA, Russell ST. The contribution of school safety to weight-related health behaviors for transgender youth. JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENCE. 2020;78:33–42.
IEEE
[1]
J. Pistella, S. Ioverno, M. A. Rodgers, and S. T. Russell, “The contribution of school safety to weight-related health behaviors for transgender youth,” JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENCE, vol. 78, pp. 33–42, 2020.
@article{8679471,
  abstract     = {Introduction: The aim of the present study is to examine gender identity disparities in different kinds of weight-related health behaviors, including physical activity, participation in physical education at school, and healthy and unhealthy eating habits, and to investigate the relationship between school safety and such behaviors in a sample of transgender and non-transgender students. Method: We analyzed a statewide sample of 31,609 students (M-age = 14.04, SD = 1.70; 1.1% transgender). We used multilevel regression models to examine the interactive effects of gender identity and perceptions of school safety on the 4 different outcome variables (physical activity, physical education, healthy and unhealthy eating habits). All models included student- and school-level characteristics as controls. Results: Findings indicated that transgender students, when compared to non-transgender students, reported (a) feeling less safe at school; (b) more physical activity, but less participation in physical education at school; and (c) both more healthy as well as unhealthy eating behaviors. Adjusted regression models showed a significant interaction between gender identity and perceived school safety on healthy eating behaviors; simple slopes indicated that transgender students have healthier eating behaviors when the school context is perceived as safe compared to those who perceived the school as less safe. Conclusions: School interventions are needed to improve school safety for transgender youth and to reduce gender identity-related disparities in healthy eating and physical activity. Research implications and limitations are discussed.},
  author       = {Pistella, Jessica and Ioverno, Salvatore and Rodgers, Melissa A. and Russell, Stephen T.},
  issn         = {0140-1971},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENCE},
  keywords     = {PHYSICAL-EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS,GENDER IDENTITY DISORDER,BODY-IMAGE,CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE,EATING-DISORDERS,YOUNG-PEOPLE,DISPARITIES,OBESITY,RISK,GAY,Transgender students,School safety,Healthy eating behaviors,Physical,activity,Gender identity},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {33--42},
  title        = {The contribution of school safety to weight-related health behaviors for transgender youth},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2019.12.001},
  volume       = {78},
  year         = {2020},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: