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Cognitive control training in healthy older adults : a proof of concept study on the effects on cognitive functioning, emotion regulation and affect

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Abstract
Background The current study sets out to explore the influence of a well-studied cognitive control training (CCT) procedure on cognitive control processes, emotion regulation (ER) and self-reported affect in older adults. Methods Thirty-nine healthy older adults (aged 64-78) participated in a randomized controlled proof-of-concept trial. Twenty-one of these participants performed 10 sessions of CCT that loads on working memory and sustained attention, the other eighteen performed 10 sessions of an active placebo training. Results CCT beneficially impacted task-specific transfer, but the training did not result in transfer to an unrelated cognitive control task (Stroop task). In addition, no effects were observed on ER processes or affect changes immediately following training, nor at 6 weeks follow-up. Conclusion At this point, the CCT seems not suitable to enhance cognitive resilience factors in older non-depressed individuals. However, there is need for more research on possible moderators of the effects, as well as larger-scale studies with longer follow-up measurements.
Keywords
DIRECT-CURRENT STIMULATION, DEPRESSED-PATIENTS, PREFRONTAL CORTEX, RUMINATION, MEMORY, INTERVENTION, MECHANISMS, STRESS, DLPFC, Cognitive control training, Older healthy adults, Cognitive functioning, Emotion regulation, Affect

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MLA
Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne, et al. “Cognitive Control Training in Healthy Older Adults : A Proof of Concept Study on the Effects on Cognitive Functioning, Emotion Regulation and Affect.” COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH, Springer/plenum Publishers, 2021, doi:10.1007/s10608-020-10154-9.
APA
Vanderhasselt, M.-A., Demeyer, I., Van Imschoot, L., Hoorelbeke, K., & De Raedt, R. (2021). Cognitive control training in healthy older adults : a proof of concept study on the effects on cognitive functioning, emotion regulation and affect. COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-020-10154-9
Chicago author-date
Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne, Ineke Demeyer, Leila Van Imschoot, Kristof Hoorelbeke, and Rudi De Raedt. 2021. “Cognitive Control Training in Healthy Older Adults : A Proof of Concept Study on the Effects on Cognitive Functioning, Emotion Regulation and Affect.” COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-020-10154-9.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne, Ineke Demeyer, Leila Van Imschoot, Kristof Hoorelbeke, and Rudi De Raedt. 2021. “Cognitive Control Training in Healthy Older Adults : A Proof of Concept Study on the Effects on Cognitive Functioning, Emotion Regulation and Affect.” COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH. doi:10.1007/s10608-020-10154-9.
Vancouver
1.
Vanderhasselt M-A, Demeyer I, Van Imschoot L, Hoorelbeke K, De Raedt R. Cognitive control training in healthy older adults : a proof of concept study on the effects on cognitive functioning, emotion regulation and affect. COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH. 2021;
IEEE
[1]
M.-A. Vanderhasselt, I. Demeyer, L. Van Imschoot, K. Hoorelbeke, and R. De Raedt, “Cognitive control training in healthy older adults : a proof of concept study on the effects on cognitive functioning, emotion regulation and affect,” COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH, 2021.
@article{8679412,
  abstract     = {Background The current study sets out to explore the influence of a well-studied cognitive control training (CCT) procedure on cognitive control processes, emotion regulation (ER) and self-reported affect in older adults. Methods Thirty-nine healthy older adults (aged 64-78) participated in a randomized controlled proof-of-concept trial. Twenty-one of these participants performed 10 sessions of CCT that loads on working memory and sustained attention, the other eighteen performed 10 sessions of an active placebo training. Results CCT beneficially impacted task-specific transfer, but the training did not result in transfer to an unrelated cognitive control task (Stroop task). In addition, no effects were observed on ER processes or affect changes immediately following training, nor at 6 weeks follow-up. Conclusion At this point, the CCT seems not suitable to enhance cognitive resilience factors in older non-depressed individuals. However, there is need for more research on possible moderators of the effects, as well as larger-scale studies with longer follow-up measurements.},
  author       = {Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne and Demeyer, Ineke and Van Imschoot, Leila and Hoorelbeke, Kristof and De Raedt, Rudi},
  issn         = {0147-5916},
  journal      = {COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH},
  keywords     = {DIRECT-CURRENT STIMULATION,DEPRESSED-PATIENTS,PREFRONTAL CORTEX,RUMINATION,MEMORY,INTERVENTION,MECHANISMS,STRESS,DLPFC,Cognitive control training,Older healthy adults,Cognitive functioning,Emotion regulation,Affect},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {10},
  publisher    = {Springer/plenum Publishers},
  title        = {Cognitive control training in healthy older adults : a proof of concept study on the effects on cognitive functioning, emotion regulation and affect},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10608-020-10154-9},
  year         = {2021},
}

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