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Atmospheric-pressure plasma assisted engineering of polymer surfaces : from high hydrophobicity to superhydrophilicity

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Abstract
To engineer polymer surfaces with long-lasting wettability properties and with high coating stability in aqueous media, we investigated the surface wettability of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films treated by radio frequency (RF) atmospheric-pressure plasma. By combining plasma activation and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO)-based plasma polymerization, stable PET surface properties from highly hydrophobic to superhydrophilic were achieved. The results clearly showed that the wettability of PET surfaces could be tuned from stable high hydrophobicity (>140°) to stable superhydrophilicity (<10°) with a minimized aging effect by using plasma activation of plasma deposited coatings. Surface roughness increase and CH3 groups introduction are primarily responsible for the coating hydrophobization, while the introduction of more oxygen-containing polar functional groups is the main factor leading to superhydrophilization. Importantly, the coatings engineered by this unique combination showed high stability in water over 14 days. Overall, this work contributes to the easy-to-overlook links between plasma activation and plasma polymerization, demonstrates that atmospheric-pressure RF plasma can be a versatile tool to control surface properties of polymers in a wide range from high hydrophobicity to superhydrophilicity with high coating stability in aqueous media and a negligible aging effect, which is promising for emerging biomedical applications.
Keywords
Atmospheric-pressure plasma, Wetting control, Plasma activation, Plasma polymerization, Organosilicone coating, DIELECTRIC BARRIER DISCHARGE, CONTACT-ANGLE, THIN-FILMS, WETTABILITY, HMDSO, XPS, PET, POLY(ETHYLENE-TEREPHTHALATE), HEXAMETHYLDISILOXANE, STABILITY

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MLA
Ma, Chuanlong, et al. “Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Assisted Engineering of Polymer Surfaces : From High Hydrophobicity to Superhydrophilicity.” APPLIED SURFACE SCIENCE, vol. 535, 2021, doi:10.1016/j.apsusc.2020.147032.
APA
Ma, C., Wang, L., Nikiforov, A., Onyshchenko, Y., Cools, P., Ostrikov, K. (Ken), … Morent, R. (2021). Atmospheric-pressure plasma assisted engineering of polymer surfaces : from high hydrophobicity to superhydrophilicity. APPLIED SURFACE SCIENCE, 535. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2020.147032
Chicago author-date
Ma, Chuanlong, Lei Wang, Anton Nikiforov, Yuliia Onyshchenko, Pieter Cools, Kostya (Ken) Ostrikov, Nathalie De Geyter, and Rino Morent. 2021. “Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Assisted Engineering of Polymer Surfaces : From High Hydrophobicity to Superhydrophilicity.” APPLIED SURFACE SCIENCE 535. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2020.147032.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Ma, Chuanlong, Lei Wang, Anton Nikiforov, Yuliia Onyshchenko, Pieter Cools, Kostya (Ken) Ostrikov, Nathalie De Geyter, and Rino Morent. 2021. “Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Assisted Engineering of Polymer Surfaces : From High Hydrophobicity to Superhydrophilicity.” APPLIED SURFACE SCIENCE 535. doi:10.1016/j.apsusc.2020.147032.
Vancouver
1.
Ma C, Wang L, Nikiforov A, Onyshchenko Y, Cools P, Ostrikov K (Ken), et al. Atmospheric-pressure plasma assisted engineering of polymer surfaces : from high hydrophobicity to superhydrophilicity. APPLIED SURFACE SCIENCE. 2021;535.
IEEE
[1]
C. Ma et al., “Atmospheric-pressure plasma assisted engineering of polymer surfaces : from high hydrophobicity to superhydrophilicity,” APPLIED SURFACE SCIENCE, vol. 535, 2021.
@article{8671716,
  abstract     = {{To engineer polymer surfaces with long-lasting wettability properties and with high coating stability in aqueous media, we investigated the surface wettability of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films treated by radio frequency (RF) atmospheric-pressure plasma. By combining plasma activation and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO)-based plasma polymerization, stable PET surface properties from highly hydrophobic to superhydrophilic were achieved. The results clearly showed that the wettability of PET surfaces could be tuned from stable high hydrophobicity (>140°) to stable superhydrophilicity (<10°) with a minimized aging effect by using plasma activation of plasma deposited coatings. Surface roughness increase and CH3 groups introduction are primarily responsible for the coating hydrophobization, while the introduction of more oxygen-containing polar functional groups is the main factor leading to superhydrophilization. Importantly, the coatings engineered by this unique combination showed high stability in water over 14 days. Overall, this work contributes to the easy-to-overlook links between plasma activation and plasma polymerization, demonstrates that atmospheric-pressure RF plasma can be a versatile tool to control surface properties of polymers in a wide range from high hydrophobicity to superhydrophilicity with high coating stability in aqueous media and a negligible aging effect, which is promising for emerging biomedical applications.}},
  articleno    = {{147032}},
  author       = {{Ma, Chuanlong and Wang, Lei and Nikiforov, Anton and Onyshchenko, Yuliia and Cools, Pieter and Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken) and De Geyter, Nathalie and Morent, Rino}},
  issn         = {{0169-4332}},
  journal      = {{APPLIED SURFACE SCIENCE}},
  keywords     = {{Atmospheric-pressure plasma,Wetting control,Plasma activation,Plasma polymerization,Organosilicone coating,DIELECTRIC BARRIER DISCHARGE,CONTACT-ANGLE,THIN-FILMS,WETTABILITY,HMDSO,XPS,PET,POLY(ETHYLENE-TEREPHTHALATE),HEXAMETHYLDISILOXANE,STABILITY}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{12}},
  title        = {{Atmospheric-pressure plasma assisted engineering of polymer surfaces : from high hydrophobicity to superhydrophilicity}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2020.147032}},
  volume       = {{535}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}

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