Advanced search
1 file | 583.01 KB Add to list

Prevalence of the nocturnal polyuria syndrome in men

(2020) NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS. 39(6). p.1732-1736
Author
Organization
Abstract
Aims Nocturnal polyuria (NP) is caused by a wide array of factors, including genitourinary and systemic comorbidities, modifiable behavior, and pharmaceuticals. When an identifying factor is absent, NP may be purely a symptom of the nocturnal polyuria syndrome (NPS) and secondary to blunting of normal arginine vasopressin action within the circadian rhythm. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of NPS in male patients attending a Veterans Affairs outpatient urology clinic. Methods Retrospective database analysis was performed of voiding diaries from men who had established care for lower urinary tract symptoms from 2007 to 2018. Patients were excluded if they reported fewer than two nocturnal voids on voiding diary analysis or had comorbidity associated with NP. Distinct cutoffs were separately employed to identify NP: nocturnal polyuria index (NPi; calculated as nocturnal urine volume divided by 24-hour urine volume) greater than 0.33; and nocturnal urine production (NUP) greater than 90 mL/h. Results A total of 283 completed voiding diaries were evaluated and 202 patients had >= 2 nocturnal voids. After exclusions, at NPi greater than 33, the floor and ceiling NPS prevalence values were 21% and 41%, respectively. At NUP greater than 90 mL/h, the floor and ceiling NPS prevalence values were 17% and 32%, respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of NPS in patients with nocturia in the present study lies between 17% and 41%. NPS constitutes a clinically relevant subgroup of nocturia among male patients in the Veterans Affairs outpatient urology setting.
Keywords
antidiuretic hormone, desmopressin, nocturia, nocturnal polyuria, urinary bladder, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, OLDER-PEOPLE, DOUBLE-BLIND, DESMOPRESSIN, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, NATRIURESIS, IMPACT

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 583.01 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Emeruwa, CJ, et al. “Prevalence of the Nocturnal Polyuria Syndrome in Men.” NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS, vol. 39, no. 6, 2020, pp. 1732–36, doi:10.1002/nau.24403.
APA
Emeruwa, C., Epstein, M., Michelson, K., Monaghan, T., & Weiss, J. (2020). Prevalence of the nocturnal polyuria syndrome in men. NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS, 39(6), 1732–1736. https://doi.org/10.1002/nau.24403
Chicago author-date
Emeruwa, CJ, MR Epstein, KP Michelson, Thomas Monaghan, and Jeffrey Weiss. 2020. “Prevalence of the Nocturnal Polyuria Syndrome in Men.” NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS 39 (6): 1732–36. https://doi.org/10.1002/nau.24403.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Emeruwa, CJ, MR Epstein, KP Michelson, Thomas Monaghan, and Jeffrey Weiss. 2020. “Prevalence of the Nocturnal Polyuria Syndrome in Men.” NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS 39 (6): 1732–1736. doi:10.1002/nau.24403.
Vancouver
1.
Emeruwa C, Epstein M, Michelson K, Monaghan T, Weiss J. Prevalence of the nocturnal polyuria syndrome in men. NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS. 2020;39(6):1732–6.
IEEE
[1]
C. Emeruwa, M. Epstein, K. Michelson, T. Monaghan, and J. Weiss, “Prevalence of the nocturnal polyuria syndrome in men,” NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS, vol. 39, no. 6, pp. 1732–1736, 2020.
@article{8670566,
  abstract     = {Aims Nocturnal polyuria (NP) is caused by a wide array of factors, including genitourinary and systemic comorbidities, modifiable behavior, and pharmaceuticals. When an identifying factor is absent, NP may be purely a symptom of the nocturnal polyuria syndrome (NPS) and secondary to blunting of normal arginine vasopressin action within the circadian rhythm. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of NPS in male patients attending a Veterans Affairs outpatient urology clinic.

Methods Retrospective database analysis was performed of voiding diaries from men who had established care for lower urinary tract symptoms from 2007 to 2018. Patients were excluded if they reported fewer than two nocturnal voids on voiding diary analysis or had comorbidity associated with NP. Distinct cutoffs were separately employed to identify NP: nocturnal polyuria index (NPi; calculated as nocturnal urine volume divided by 24-hour urine volume) greater than 0.33; and nocturnal urine production (NUP) greater than 90 mL/h.

Results A total of 283 completed voiding diaries were evaluated and 202 patients had >= 2 nocturnal voids. After exclusions, at NPi greater than 33, the floor and ceiling NPS prevalence values were 21% and 41%, respectively. At NUP greater than 90 mL/h, the floor and ceiling NPS prevalence values were 17% and 32%, respectively.

Conclusions The prevalence of NPS in patients with nocturia in the present study lies between 17% and 41%. NPS constitutes a clinically relevant subgroup of nocturia among male patients in the Veterans Affairs outpatient urology setting.},
  author       = {Emeruwa, CJ and Epstein, MR and Michelson, KP and Monaghan, Thomas and Weiss, Jeffrey},
  issn         = {0733-2467},
  journal      = {NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS},
  keywords     = {antidiuretic hormone,desmopressin,nocturia,nocturnal polyuria,urinary bladder,QUALITY-OF-LIFE,OLDER-PEOPLE,DOUBLE-BLIND,DESMOPRESSIN,PATHOPHYSIOLOGY,NATRIURESIS,IMPACT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1732--1736},
  title        = {Prevalence of the nocturnal polyuria syndrome in men},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nau.24403},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2020},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: