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All eyes on me : behaving as soloist in duo performances leads to increased body movements and attracts observers' visual attention

(2020) MUSIC PERCEPTION. 38(2). p.195-213
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Abstract
Duo musicians exhibit a broad variety of bodily gestures, but it is unclear how soloists’ and accompanists’ movements differ within the duo and to what extent they attract observers’ visual attention. In Experiment 1, seven musical duos’ body movements were tracked while they performed two pieces in two different conditions. In a congruent condition, soloist and accompanist behaved according to their expected musical roles; in an incongruent condition, the soloist behaved as accompanist and vice versa. Results revealed that behaving as soloist, regardless of the condition, led to more, smoother and faster head and shoulder movements over a larger area than behaving as accompanist. Moreover, accompanists in the incongruent condition moved more than soloists in the congruent condition. In Experiment 2, observers watched videos of the duo performances with and without audio, while eye movements were tracked. Observers looked longer at musicians behaving as soloists compared to musicians behaving as accompanists, independent of their respective musical role. This suggests that visual attention was allocated to the most salient visuo-kinematic cues (i.e. expressive bodily gestures) rather than the most salient musical cues (i.e. the solo part). Findings are discussed regarding auditory-motor couplings and theories of motor control as well as auditory-visual integration and attention.
Keywords
Bodily gestures in musical duo performances, motion capture, eye tracking, auditory-motor coupling, audio-visual perception and attention, CROSS-MODAL INTERACTIONS, STAGE BEHAVIOR, PHYSICAL APPEARANCE, MUSIC PERFORMANCE, CONCERT DRESS, SEEING MUSIC, PERCEPTION, PIANISTS, RECOGNITION, ATTRACTIVENESS

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MLA
Küssner, Mats, et al. “All Eyes on Me : Behaving as Soloist in Duo Performances Leads to Increased Body Movements and Attracts Observers’ Visual Attention.” MUSIC PERCEPTION, vol. 38, no. 2, 2020, pp. 195–213, doi:10.1525/mp.2020.38.2.195.
APA
Küssner, M., Van Dyck, E., Burger, B., Moelants, D., & Vansteenkiste, P. (2020). All eyes on me : behaving as soloist in duo performances leads to increased body movements and attracts observers’ visual attention. MUSIC PERCEPTION, 38(2), 195–213. https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2020.38.2.195
Chicago author-date
Küssner, Mats, Edith Van Dyck, Birgitta Burger, Dirk Moelants, and Pieter Vansteenkiste. 2020. “All Eyes on Me : Behaving as Soloist in Duo Performances Leads to Increased Body Movements and Attracts Observers’ Visual Attention.” MUSIC PERCEPTION 38 (2): 195–213. https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2020.38.2.195.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Küssner, Mats, Edith Van Dyck, Birgitta Burger, Dirk Moelants, and Pieter Vansteenkiste. 2020. “All Eyes on Me : Behaving as Soloist in Duo Performances Leads to Increased Body Movements and Attracts Observers’ Visual Attention.” MUSIC PERCEPTION 38 (2): 195–213. doi:10.1525/mp.2020.38.2.195.
Vancouver
1.
Küssner M, Van Dyck E, Burger B, Moelants D, Vansteenkiste P. All eyes on me : behaving as soloist in duo performances leads to increased body movements and attracts observers’ visual attention. MUSIC PERCEPTION. 2020;38(2):195–213.
IEEE
[1]
M. Küssner, E. Van Dyck, B. Burger, D. Moelants, and P. Vansteenkiste, “All eyes on me : behaving as soloist in duo performances leads to increased body movements and attracts observers’ visual attention,” MUSIC PERCEPTION, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 195–213, 2020.
@article{8670061,
  abstract     = {{Duo musicians exhibit a broad variety of bodily gestures, but it is unclear how soloists’ and accompanists’ movements differ within the duo and to what extent they attract observers’ visual attention. In Experiment 1, seven musical duos’ body movements were tracked while they performed two pieces in two different conditions. In a congruent condition, soloist and accompanist behaved according to their expected musical roles; in an incongruent condition, the soloist behaved as accompanist and vice versa. Results revealed that behaving as soloist, regardless of the condition, led to more, smoother and faster head and shoulder movements over a larger area than behaving as accompanist. Moreover, accompanists in the incongruent condition moved more than soloists in the congruent condition. In Experiment 2, observers watched videos of the duo performances with and without audio, while eye movements were tracked. Observers looked longer at musicians behaving as soloists compared to musicians behaving as accompanists, independent of their respective musical role. This suggests that visual attention was allocated to the most salient visuo-kinematic cues (i.e. expressive bodily gestures) rather than the most salient musical cues (i.e. the solo part). Findings are discussed regarding auditory-motor couplings and theories of motor control as well as auditory-visual integration and attention.}},
  author       = {{Küssner, Mats and Van Dyck, Edith and Burger, Birgitta and Moelants, Dirk and Vansteenkiste, Pieter}},
  issn         = {{0730-7829}},
  journal      = {{MUSIC PERCEPTION}},
  keywords     = {{Bodily gestures in musical duo performances,motion capture,eye tracking,auditory-motor coupling,audio-visual perception and attention,CROSS-MODAL INTERACTIONS,STAGE BEHAVIOR,PHYSICAL APPEARANCE,MUSIC PERFORMANCE,CONCERT DRESS,SEEING MUSIC,PERCEPTION,PIANISTS,RECOGNITION,ATTRACTIVENESS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{2}},
  pages        = {{195--213}},
  title        = {{All eyes on me : behaving as soloist in duo performances leads to increased body movements and attracts observers' visual attention}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/mp.2020.38.2.195}},
  volume       = {{38}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}

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