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Somatosensory attentional modulations during pain-related movement execution

(2020) EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH. 238(5). p.1169-1176
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Abstract
Pain serves to protect against bodily threat, and therefore initiates protective responses such as attending toward threat-relevant information. Since pain is often exacerbated by executing movements, these motor actions may serve as cues for pain. Up to date, however, pain-related attention during movement remains largely unexplored. While it has been shown that the preparation of a pain-related movement leads to enhanced processing of somatosensory information, it is unclear how the actual execution of a movement interacts with somatosensory attention. In the current study, we examined whether somatosensory processing is enhanced at a moving body part when the movement is expected to be associated with pain. Participants were asked to execute hand movements which were occasionally followed by a pain stimulus. To measure somatosensory attention, a task-irrelevant, innocuous tactile probe was presented on either hand to evoke a somatosensory evoked potential (SEP). The results showed an elevation of the N120 SEP at the hand performing a potentially painful movement, indicating heightened attention toward tactile information at the threatened moving hand compared to the non-threatened hand. Additionally, the P200 SEP also showed enlarged responses when performing a pain-related movement compared to a no-pain-related movement. These results show that not only the anticipation, but also the execution of pain-related movements, may modulate the processing of somatosensory input, driven by attentional processes.
Keywords
FEAR-AVOIDANCE MODEL, SPATIAL ATTENTION, AWARENESS QUESTIONNAIRE, MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN, TACTILE PERCEPTION, ANTICIPATION, ACQUISITION, SUPPRESSION, TRANSIENT, VIGILANCE, SEP, Somatosensory, Attention, Movement

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Clauwaert, Amanda, et al. “Somatosensory Attentional Modulations during Pain-Related Movement Execution.” EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH, vol. 238, no. 5, 2020, pp. 1169–76, doi:10.1007/s00221-020-05790-2.
APA
Clauwaert, A., Torta, D. M., Forster, B., Danneels, L., & Van Damme, S. (2020). Somatosensory attentional modulations during pain-related movement execution. EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH, 238(5), 1169–1176. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-020-05790-2
Chicago author-date
Clauwaert, Amanda, D. M. Torta, B. Forster, Lieven Danneels, and Stefaan Van Damme. 2020. “Somatosensory Attentional Modulations during Pain-Related Movement Execution.” EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH 238 (5): 1169–76. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-020-05790-2.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Clauwaert, Amanda, D. M. Torta, B. Forster, Lieven Danneels, and Stefaan Van Damme. 2020. “Somatosensory Attentional Modulations during Pain-Related Movement Execution.” EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH 238 (5): 1169–1176. doi:10.1007/s00221-020-05790-2.
Vancouver
1.
Clauwaert A, Torta DM, Forster B, Danneels L, Van Damme S. Somatosensory attentional modulations during pain-related movement execution. EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH. 2020;238(5):1169–76.
IEEE
[1]
A. Clauwaert, D. M. Torta, B. Forster, L. Danneels, and S. Van Damme, “Somatosensory attentional modulations during pain-related movement execution,” EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH, vol. 238, no. 5, pp. 1169–1176, 2020.
@article{8668234,
  abstract     = {{Pain serves to protect against bodily threat, and therefore initiates protective responses such as attending toward threat-relevant information. Since pain is often exacerbated by executing movements, these motor actions may serve as cues for pain. Up to date, however, pain-related attention during movement remains largely unexplored. While it has been shown that the preparation of a pain-related movement leads to enhanced processing of somatosensory information, it is unclear how the actual execution of a movement interacts with somatosensory attention. In the current study, we examined whether somatosensory processing is enhanced at a moving body part when the movement is expected to be associated with pain. Participants were asked to execute hand movements which were occasionally followed by a pain stimulus. To measure somatosensory attention, a task-irrelevant, innocuous tactile probe was presented on either hand to evoke a somatosensory evoked potential (SEP). The results showed an elevation of the N120 SEP at the hand performing a potentially painful movement, indicating heightened attention toward tactile information at the threatened moving hand compared to the non-threatened hand. Additionally, the P200 SEP also showed enlarged responses when performing a pain-related movement compared to a no-pain-related movement. These results show that not only the anticipation, but also the execution of pain-related movements, may modulate the processing of somatosensory input, driven by attentional processes.}},
  author       = {{Clauwaert, Amanda and Torta, D. M. and Forster, B. and Danneels, Lieven and Van Damme, Stefaan}},
  issn         = {{0014-4819}},
  journal      = {{EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH}},
  keywords     = {{FEAR-AVOIDANCE MODEL,SPATIAL ATTENTION,AWARENESS QUESTIONNAIRE,MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN,TACTILE PERCEPTION,ANTICIPATION,ACQUISITION,SUPPRESSION,TRANSIENT,VIGILANCE,SEP,Somatosensory,Attention,Movement}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{5}},
  pages        = {{1169--1176}},
  title        = {{Somatosensory attentional modulations during pain-related movement execution}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-020-05790-2}},
  volume       = {{238}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}

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