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Bridging the gap : virus long-distance spread via tunneling nanotubes

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Abstract
Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are actin-based intercellular conduits that connect distant cells and allow intercellular transfer of molecular information, including genetic information, proteins, lipids, and even organelles. Besides providing a means of intercellular communication, TNTs may also be hijacked by pathogens, particularly viruses, to facilitate their spread. Viruses of many different families, including retroviruses, herpesviruses, orthomyxoviruses, and several others have been reported to trigger the formation of TNTs or TNT-like structures in infected cells and use these structures to efficiently spread to uninfected cells. In the current review, we give an overview of the information that is currently available on viruses and TNT-like structures, and we discuss some of the standing questions in this field.
Keywords
ACTIN-BASED MOTILITY, RICE-DWARF-VIRUS, VACCINIA VIRUS, MEMBRANE, NANOTUBES, US3 PROTEIN, N-WASP, TNT FORMATION, CUTTING EDGE, MYOSIN-X, CELLS, TNT, antibodies, intercellular, spread, tunneling nanotubes, virus

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MLA
Jansens, Robert, et al. “Bridging the Gap : Virus Long-Distance Spread via Tunneling Nanotubes.” JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY, vol. 94, no. 8, 2020, doi:10.1128/JVI.02120-19.
APA
Jansens, R., Tishchenko Khoruzh, A., & Favoreel, H. (2020). Bridging the gap : virus long-distance spread via tunneling nanotubes. JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY, 94(8). https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02120-19
Chicago author-date
Jansens, Robert, Alexander Tishchenko Khoruzh, and Herman Favoreel. 2020. “Bridging the Gap : Virus Long-Distance Spread via Tunneling Nanotubes.” JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY 94 (8). https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02120-19.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Jansens, Robert, Alexander Tishchenko Khoruzh, and Herman Favoreel. 2020. “Bridging the Gap : Virus Long-Distance Spread via Tunneling Nanotubes.” JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY 94 (8). doi:10.1128/JVI.02120-19.
Vancouver
1.
Jansens R, Tishchenko Khoruzh A, Favoreel H. Bridging the gap : virus long-distance spread via tunneling nanotubes. JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY. 2020;94(8).
IEEE
[1]
R. Jansens, A. Tishchenko Khoruzh, and H. Favoreel, “Bridging the gap : virus long-distance spread via tunneling nanotubes,” JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY, vol. 94, no. 8, 2020.
@article{8668094,
  abstract     = {{Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are actin-based intercellular conduits that connect distant cells and allow intercellular transfer of molecular information, including genetic information, proteins, lipids, and even organelles. Besides providing a means of intercellular communication, TNTs may also be hijacked by pathogens, particularly viruses, to facilitate their spread. Viruses of many different families, including retroviruses, herpesviruses, orthomyxoviruses, and several others have been reported to trigger the formation of TNTs or TNT-like structures in infected cells and use these structures to efficiently spread to uninfected cells. In the current review, we give an overview of the information that is currently available on viruses and TNT-like structures, and we discuss some of the standing questions in this field.}},
  articleno    = {{e02120-19}},
  author       = {{Jansens, Robert and Tishchenko Khoruzh, Alexander and Favoreel, Herman}},
  issn         = {{0022-538X}},
  journal      = {{JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY}},
  keywords     = {{ACTIN-BASED MOTILITY,RICE-DWARF-VIRUS,VACCINIA VIRUS,MEMBRANE,NANOTUBES,US3 PROTEIN,N-WASP,TNT FORMATION,CUTTING EDGE,MYOSIN-X,CELLS,TNT,antibodies,intercellular,spread,tunneling nanotubes,virus}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{8}},
  pages        = {{14}},
  title        = {{Bridging the gap : virus long-distance spread via tunneling nanotubes}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02120-19}},
  volume       = {{94}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}

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