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The use of superabsorbent polymers in high performance concrete to mitigate autogenous shrinkage in a large-scale demonstrator

(2020) SUSTAINABILITY. 12(11).
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Abstract
High performance concrete (HPC) is a high strength concrete that undergoes a lot of early-age autogenous shrinkage (AS). If shrinkage is restrained, then micro-cracks arise and threaten the durability of the structure. Superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) can reduce/mitigate the autogenous shrinkage, due to their promising application as internal curing agents. In this paper, large-scale demonstrators were built to investigate the efficiency of SAPs to mitigate autogenous shrinkage in HPC. For this purpose, different measurement techniques were used like embedded fiber optic sensors and demountable mechanical strain gauges, complemented by AS measurements in corrugated tubes and restrained ring tests. The SAP wall showed an AS reduction of 22%, 54%, and 60% at the bottom, middle, and top, respectively, as recorded by the sensors (in comparison with the reference wall (REF)). In the corrugated tubes, mitigation of AS was shown in the SAP mixture, and under restrained conditions, in the ring test, the reference mixture cracked after two days, while the SAP mixture had not cracked at the end of the measurement period (20 days). Cracks were shown on REF wall after one day, while the SAP wall was crack-free. Water flow tests performed on the main crack of the REF wall confirmed that the flow rate is related to the third power of the crack width. All tests showed that SAPs could highly reduce AS in HPC and avoid cracking.
Keywords
Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment, Geography, Planning and Development, Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law, high performance concrete, internal curing, superabsorbent polymers, autogenous shrinkage, large-scale testing, WATER PERMEABILITY, CEMENT, TEMPERATURE

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MLA
De Meyst, Laurence, et al. “The Use of Superabsorbent Polymers in High Performance Concrete to Mitigate Autogenous Shrinkage in a Large-Scale Demonstrator.” SUSTAINABILITY, vol. 12, no. 11, 2020, doi:10.3390/su12114741.
APA
De Meyst, L., Kheir, J., Tenório Filho, J. R., Van Tittelboom, K., & De Belie, N. (2020). The use of superabsorbent polymers in high performance concrete to mitigate autogenous shrinkage in a large-scale demonstrator. SUSTAINABILITY, 12(11). https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114741
Chicago author-date
De Meyst, Laurence, Judy Kheir, José Roberto Tenório Filho, Kim Van Tittelboom, and Nele De Belie. 2020. “The Use of Superabsorbent Polymers in High Performance Concrete to Mitigate Autogenous Shrinkage in a Large-Scale Demonstrator.” SUSTAINABILITY 12 (11). https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114741.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Meyst, Laurence, Judy Kheir, José Roberto Tenório Filho, Kim Van Tittelboom, and Nele De Belie. 2020. “The Use of Superabsorbent Polymers in High Performance Concrete to Mitigate Autogenous Shrinkage in a Large-Scale Demonstrator.” SUSTAINABILITY 12 (11). doi:10.3390/su12114741.
Vancouver
1.
De Meyst L, Kheir J, Tenório Filho JR, Van Tittelboom K, De Belie N. The use of superabsorbent polymers in high performance concrete to mitigate autogenous shrinkage in a large-scale demonstrator. SUSTAINABILITY. 2020;12(11).
IEEE
[1]
L. De Meyst, J. Kheir, J. R. Tenório Filho, K. Van Tittelboom, and N. De Belie, “The use of superabsorbent polymers in high performance concrete to mitigate autogenous shrinkage in a large-scale demonstrator,” SUSTAINABILITY, vol. 12, no. 11, 2020.
@article{8667703,
  abstract     = {High performance concrete (HPC) is a high strength concrete that undergoes a lot of early-age autogenous shrinkage (AS). If shrinkage is restrained, then micro-cracks arise and threaten the durability of the structure. Superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) can reduce/mitigate the autogenous shrinkage, due to their promising application as internal curing agents. In this paper, large-scale demonstrators were built to investigate the efficiency of SAPs to mitigate autogenous shrinkage in HPC. For this purpose, different measurement techniques were used like embedded fiber optic sensors and demountable mechanical strain gauges, complemented by AS measurements in corrugated tubes and restrained ring tests. The SAP wall showed an AS reduction of 22%, 54%, and 60% at the bottom, middle, and top, respectively, as recorded by the sensors (in comparison with the reference wall (REF)). In the corrugated tubes, mitigation of AS was shown in the SAP mixture, and under restrained conditions, in the ring test, the reference mixture cracked after two days, while the SAP mixture had not cracked at the end of the measurement period (20 days). Cracks were shown on REF wall after one day, while the SAP wall was crack-free. Water flow tests performed on the main crack of the REF wall confirmed that the flow rate is related to the third power of the crack width. All tests showed that SAPs could highly reduce AS in HPC and avoid cracking.},
  articleno    = {4741},
  author       = {De Meyst, Laurence and Kheir, Judy and Tenório Filho, José Roberto and Van Tittelboom, Kim and De Belie, Nele},
  issn         = {2071-1050},
  journal      = {SUSTAINABILITY},
  keywords     = {Renewable Energy,Sustainability and the Environment,Geography,Planning and Development,Management,Monitoring,Policy and Law,high performance concrete,internal curing,superabsorbent polymers,autogenous shrinkage,large-scale testing,WATER PERMEABILITY,CEMENT,TEMPERATURE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {24},
  title        = {The use of superabsorbent polymers in high performance concrete to mitigate autogenous shrinkage in a large-scale demonstrator},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/su12114741},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2020},
}

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