Advanced search
1 file | 63.34 KB Add to list

Quetiapine treatment and improved cognitive functioning in borderline personality disorder

Author
Organization
Abstract
Objective: We aimed to assess whether executive functioning improved over time in a sample of borderline personality disorder (BPD) subjects that took part in a quetiapine treatment trial. Methods: Performance on the following neurocognitive tasks was assessed at enrolment and at the end of the 12 weeks quetiapine treatment: Trail Making Task, Word Fluency Task and Tower of London Task. Forty-one BPD patients were recruited, of whom 32 completed the trial. An intention-to-treat analysis with a mixed linear model was applied. Results: The data show that participants significantly improved on most executive functioning measures. Patients' scores decreased significantly (mean [SD] difference; p-value) on the Trail Making Task Part A (11.7 [2.3];p < 0.0001), Part B (51.8 [9.2]; p < 0.0001) and 'B minus A' (40.1 [8.2]; p < 0.0001), on a Phonological (15.9 [1.6]; p < 0.0001) and Semantic (9.8 [1.1]; p < 0.0001) Verbal Fluency tasks, and on the Tower of London total correct score (2.5 [0.4]; p < 0.0001), total move score (29.5 [4.5]; p < 0.0001) and total time (172.9 [35.8]; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: In this study we have demonstrated that executive functioning in BPD is improved after treatment with quetiapine. Neurocognitive measures of executive functioning should be considered as valuable outcomes in the study of treatment efficacy in BPD. Copyright (C) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Keywords
borderline personality disorder, executive functions, quetiapine, cognitive functioning, DOUBLE-BLIND, SCHIZOPHRENIA, METAANALYSIS, RISPERIDONE, PSYCHIATRY, EFFICACY

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 63.34 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
VAN DEN EYNDE, FREDERIQUE et al. “Quetiapine Treatment and Improved Cognitive Functioning in Borderline Personality Disorder.” HUMAN PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL 24.8 (2009): 646–649. Print.
APA
VAN DEN EYNDE, F., DE SAEDELEER, S., Naudts, K., Day, J., Vogels, C., Van Heeringen, C., & Audenaert, K. (2009). Quetiapine treatment and improved cognitive functioning in borderline personality disorder. HUMAN PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL, 24(8), 646–649.
Chicago author-date
VAN DEN EYNDE, FREDERIQUE, SOFIE DE SAEDELEER, Kris Naudts, Jemma Day, Caroline Vogels, Cornelis Van Heeringen, and Kurt Audenaert. 2009. “Quetiapine Treatment and Improved Cognitive Functioning in Borderline Personality Disorder.” Human Psychopharmacology-clinical and Experimental 24 (8): 646–649.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
VAN DEN EYNDE, FREDERIQUE, SOFIE DE SAEDELEER, Kris Naudts, Jemma Day, Caroline Vogels, Cornelis Van Heeringen, and Kurt Audenaert. 2009. “Quetiapine Treatment and Improved Cognitive Functioning in Borderline Personality Disorder.” Human Psychopharmacology-clinical and Experimental 24 (8): 646–649.
Vancouver
1.
VAN DEN EYNDE F, DE SAEDELEER S, Naudts K, Day J, Vogels C, Van Heeringen C, et al. Quetiapine treatment and improved cognitive functioning in borderline personality disorder. HUMAN PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL. 2009;24(8):646–9.
IEEE
[1]
F. VAN DEN EYNDE et al., “Quetiapine treatment and improved cognitive functioning in borderline personality disorder,” HUMAN PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL, vol. 24, no. 8, pp. 646–649, 2009.
@article{866623,
  abstract     = {Objective: We aimed to assess whether executive functioning improved over time in a sample of borderline personality disorder (BPD) subjects that took part in a quetiapine treatment trial. Methods: Performance on the following neurocognitive tasks was assessed at enrolment and at the end of the 12 weeks quetiapine treatment: Trail Making Task, Word Fluency Task and Tower of London Task. Forty-one BPD patients were recruited, of whom 32 completed the trial. An intention-to-treat analysis with a mixed linear model was applied. Results: The data show that participants significantly improved on most executive functioning measures. Patients' scores decreased significantly (mean [SD] difference; p-value) on the Trail Making Task Part A (11.7 [2.3];p < 0.0001), Part B (51.8 [9.2]; p < 0.0001) and 'B minus A' (40.1 [8.2]; p < 0.0001), on a Phonological (15.9 [1.6]; p < 0.0001) and Semantic (9.8 [1.1]; p < 0.0001) Verbal Fluency tasks, and on the Tower of London total correct score (2.5 [0.4]; p < 0.0001), total move score (29.5 [4.5]; p < 0.0001) and total time (172.9 [35.8]; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: In this study we have demonstrated that executive functioning in BPD is improved after treatment with quetiapine. Neurocognitive measures of executive functioning should be considered as valuable outcomes in the study of treatment efficacy in BPD. Copyright (C) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {VAN DEN EYNDE, FREDERIQUE and DE SAEDELEER, SOFIE and Naudts, Kris and Day, Jemma and Vogels, Caroline and Van Heeringen, Cornelis and Audenaert, Kurt},
  issn         = {0885-6222},
  journal      = {HUMAN PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL},
  keywords     = {borderline personality disorder,executive functions,quetiapine,cognitive functioning,DOUBLE-BLIND,SCHIZOPHRENIA,METAANALYSIS,RISPERIDONE,PSYCHIATRY,EFFICACY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {646--649},
  title        = {Quetiapine treatment and improved cognitive functioning in borderline personality disorder},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hup.1075},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2009},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: