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Ancient genomes reveal complex patterns of population movement, interaction, and replacement in sub-Saharan Africa

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  • KONGOKING (Political centralization, economic integration and language evolution in Central Africa: An interdisciplinary approach to the early history of the Kongo kingdom)
  • BANTUFIRST (The First Bantu Speakers South of the Rainforest: A Cross-Disciplinary Approach to Human Migration, Language Spread, Climate Change and Early Farming in Late Holocene Central Africa)
Abstract
Africa hosts the greatest human genetic diversity globally, but legacies of ancient population interactions and dispersals across the continent remain understudied. Here, we report genome-wide data from 20 ancient sub-Saharan African individuals, including the first reported ancient DNA from the DRC, Uganda, and Botswana. These data demonstrate the contraction of diverse, once contiguous hunter-gatherer populations, and suggest the resistance to interaction with incoming pastoralists of delayed-return foragers in aquatic environments. We refine models for the spread of food producers into eastern and southern Africa, demonstrating more complex trajectories of admixture than previously suggested. In Botswana, we show that Bantu ancestry post-dates admixture between pastoralists and foragers, suggesting an earlier spread of pastoralism than farming to southern Africa. Our findings demonstrate how processes of migration and admixture have markedly reshaped the genetic map of sub-Saharan Africa in the past few millennia and highlight the utility of combined archaeological and archaeogenetic approaches.

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Citation

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MLA
Wang, Ke, et al. “Ancient Genomes Reveal Complex Patterns of Population Movement, Interaction, and Replacement in Sub-Saharan Africa.” SCIENCE ADVANCES, vol. 6, no. 24, 2020, doi:10.1126/sciadv.aaz0183.
APA
Wang, K., Goldstein, S., Bleasdale, M., Clist, B.-O., Bostoen, K., Bakwa-Lufu, P., … Schiffels, S. (2020). Ancient genomes reveal complex patterns of population movement, interaction, and replacement in sub-Saharan Africa. SCIENCE ADVANCES, 6(24). https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aaz0183
Chicago author-date
Wang, Ke, Steven Goldstein, Madeleine Bleasdale, Bernard-Olivier Clist, Koen Bostoen, Paul Bakwa-Lufu, Laura T. Buck, et al. 2020. “Ancient Genomes Reveal Complex Patterns of Population Movement, Interaction, and Replacement in Sub-Saharan Africa.” SCIENCE ADVANCES 6 (24). https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aaz0183.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Wang, Ke, Steven Goldstein, Madeleine Bleasdale, Bernard-Olivier Clist, Koen Bostoen, Paul Bakwa-Lufu, Laura T. Buck, Alison Crowther, Alioune Dème, Roderick J. McIntosh, Julio Mercader, Christine Ogola, Robert C. Power, Elizabeth Sawchuk, Peter Robertshaw, Edwin N. Wilmsen, Michael Petraglia, Emmanuel Ndiema, Fredrick K. Manthi, Johannes Krause, Patrick Roberts, Nicole Boivin, and Stephan Schiffels. 2020. “Ancient Genomes Reveal Complex Patterns of Population Movement, Interaction, and Replacement in Sub-Saharan Africa.” SCIENCE ADVANCES 6 (24). doi:10.1126/sciadv.aaz0183.
Vancouver
1.
Wang K, Goldstein S, Bleasdale M, Clist B-O, Bostoen K, Bakwa-Lufu P, et al. Ancient genomes reveal complex patterns of population movement, interaction, and replacement in sub-Saharan Africa. SCIENCE ADVANCES. 2020;6(24).
IEEE
[1]
K. Wang et al., “Ancient genomes reveal complex patterns of population movement, interaction, and replacement in sub-Saharan Africa,” SCIENCE ADVANCES, vol. 6, no. 24, 2020.
@article{8665632,
  abstract     = {Africa hosts the greatest human genetic diversity globally, but legacies of ancient population interactions and dispersals across the continent remain understudied. Here, we report genome-wide data from 20 ancient sub-Saharan African individuals, including the first reported ancient DNA from the DRC, Uganda, and Botswana. These data demonstrate the contraction of diverse, once contiguous hunter-gatherer populations, and suggest the resistance to interaction with incoming pastoralists of delayed-return foragers in aquatic environments. We refine models for the spread of food producers into eastern and southern Africa, demonstrating more complex trajectories of admixture than previously suggested. In Botswana, we show that Bantu ancestry post-dates admixture between pastoralists and foragers, suggesting an earlier spread of pastoralism than farming to southern Africa. Our findings demonstrate how processes of migration and admixture have markedly reshaped the genetic map of sub-Saharan Africa in the past few millennia and highlight the utility of combined archaeological and archaeogenetic approaches.},
  articleno    = {eaaz0183},
  author       = {Wang, Ke and Goldstein, Steven and Bleasdale, Madeleine and Clist, Bernard-Olivier and Bostoen, Koen and Bakwa-Lufu, Paul and Buck, Laura T. and Crowther, Alison and Dème, Alioune and McIntosh, Roderick J. and Mercader, Julio and Ogola, Christine and Power, Robert C. and Sawchuk, Elizabeth and Robertshaw, Peter and Wilmsen, Edwin N. and Petraglia, Michael and Ndiema, Emmanuel and Manthi, Fredrick K. and Krause, Johannes and Roberts, Patrick and Boivin, Nicole and Schiffels, Stephan},
  issn         = {2375-2548},
  journal      = {SCIENCE ADVANCES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {24},
  pages        = {15},
  title        = {Ancient genomes reveal complex patterns of population movement, interaction, and replacement in sub-Saharan Africa},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aaz0183},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2020},
}

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