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Childhood abuse and adult sociocognitive skills : distinguishing between self and other following early trauma

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Abstract
Experience of childhood abuse (CA) impairs complex social functioning in children; however, much less is known about its effects on basic sociocognitive processes and even fewer studies have investigated these in adult survivors. Using two behavioral tasks, this study investigated spontaneous theory of mind (ToM) and imitative behavior in 41 women with CA and 26 unaffected comparison (UC) women. In the spontaneous ToM task, UCs showed a larger ToM index than CAs, indicating more facilitation by knowledge of another's false belief. In the imitation-inhibition task, CAs experienced less interference than UCs when observing another's incongruent movements. After controlling for depression, differences in ToM became marginally significant, yet remained highly significant for inhibiting imitative behavior. The findings suggest CA survivors have altered perspective-taking and are less influenced by others' perspectives, potentially due to changes in self-other distinction. Clinical implications regarding therapeutic practice with survivors of CA are discussed.
Keywords
POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER, MALTREATED CHILDREN, PEER RELATIONS, MIND, OXYTOCIN, EMPATHY, WOMEN, childhood abuse, imitative behavior, psychological trauma, self-other, distinction, theory of mind

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MLA
Hudson, Anna, et al. “Childhood Abuse and Adult Sociocognitive Skills : Distinguishing between Self and Other Following Early Trauma.” JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE, 2020, doi:10.1177/0886260520906190.
APA
Hudson, A., De Coster, L., Spoormans, H., Verbeke, S., Van der Jeught, K., Brass, M., & Müller, S. (2020). Childhood abuse and adult sociocognitive skills : distinguishing between self and other following early trauma. JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260520906190
Chicago author-date
Hudson, Anna, Lize De Coster, Hanne Spoormans, Sylvia Verbeke, Kaat Van der Jeught, Marcel Brass, and Sven Müller. 2020. “Childhood Abuse and Adult Sociocognitive Skills : Distinguishing between Self and Other Following Early Trauma.” JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260520906190.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Hudson, Anna, Lize De Coster, Hanne Spoormans, Sylvia Verbeke, Kaat Van der Jeught, Marcel Brass, and Sven Müller. 2020. “Childhood Abuse and Adult Sociocognitive Skills : Distinguishing between Self and Other Following Early Trauma.” JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE. doi:10.1177/0886260520906190.
Vancouver
1.
Hudson A, De Coster L, Spoormans H, Verbeke S, Van der Jeught K, Brass M, et al. Childhood abuse and adult sociocognitive skills : distinguishing between self and other following early trauma. JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE. 2020;
IEEE
[1]
A. Hudson et al., “Childhood abuse and adult sociocognitive skills : distinguishing between self and other following early trauma,” JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE, 2020.
@article{8664986,
  abstract     = {Experience of childhood abuse (CA) impairs complex social functioning in children; however, much less is known about its effects on basic sociocognitive processes and even fewer studies have investigated these in adult survivors. Using two behavioral tasks, this study investigated spontaneous theory of mind (ToM) and imitative behavior in 41 women with CA and 26 unaffected comparison (UC) women. In the spontaneous ToM task, UCs showed a larger ToM index than CAs, indicating more facilitation by knowledge of another's false belief. In the imitation-inhibition task, CAs experienced less interference than UCs when observing another's incongruent movements. After controlling for depression, differences in ToM became marginally significant, yet remained highly significant for inhibiting imitative behavior. The findings suggest CA survivors have altered perspective-taking and are less influenced by others' perspectives, potentially due to changes in self-other distinction. Clinical implications regarding therapeutic practice with survivors of CA are discussed.},
  articleno    = {0886260520906190},
  author       = {Hudson, Anna and De Coster, Lize and Spoormans, Hanne and Verbeke, Sylvia and Van der Jeught, Kaat and Brass, Marcel and Müller, Sven},
  issn         = {0886-2605},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE},
  keywords     = {POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER,MALTREATED CHILDREN,PEER RELATIONS,MIND,OXYTOCIN,EMPATHY,WOMEN,childhood abuse,imitative behavior,psychological trauma,self-other,distinction,theory of mind},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {21},
  title        = {Childhood abuse and adult sociocognitive skills : distinguishing between self and other following early trauma},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0886260520906190},
  year         = {2020},
}

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