Advanced search
2 files | 1.33 MB Add to list

Employee acceptability of wearable mental workload monitoring : exploring effects of framing the goal and context in corporate communication

Bram Van Acker (UGent) , Peter Conradie (UGent) , Peter Vlerick (UGent) and Jelle Saldien (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Development of wearable mental workload (MWL) measures thrives, especially as leveraged by Industry 4.0. When employees object to wearing such gauges; however, research efforts might end up redundant. Based on self-determination and communication theories, this study assumed that employees’ acceptability of wearable MWL-monitoring is shaped by framing characteristics in corporate communication. Specifically, we hypothesized that acceptability depends on how (1) the technology’s goals and (2) context of implementation is framed. A pilot study (N = 150) revealed that framing wearable MWL-monitoring in terms of serving intrinsic goals (e.g., improving health) in an autonomy-supportive context (e.g., allowing discussion) induced a higher employee acceptability, compared to framing the technology in terms of serving extrinsic goals (e.g., increasing productivity) in a controlling context (e.g., mandating use). A subsequent pre-registered study (N = 350) could, however, not replicate this result. Instead, higher acceptability was associated with higher technology readiness, lower education levels, and being a woman (for the trust component of acceptability). Independent of conditions, mean acceptability, interestingly, panned out neutral. The current work is thereby the first exploring the complexities of employee acceptability of wearable MWL-monitoring and, based on open-ended questions, finally suggests that privacy management might be the most pivotal explanatory variable.
Keywords
User acceptability, Corporate communication, Wearables, Mental workload, Self-determination theory, Industry 4.0, SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY, TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE, USER ACCEPTANCE, INFORMATION-TECHNOLOGY, AUTONOMY SUPPORT, AMERICAN-DREAM, MEDIATING ROLE, WORKPLACE, PERFORMANCE, HEALTH

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 890.58 KB
  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Accepted manuscript)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 436.02 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Van Acker, Bram, et al. “Employee Acceptability of Wearable Mental Workload Monitoring : Exploring Effects of Framing the Goal and Context in Corporate Communication.” COGNITION TECHNOLOGY & WORK, 2021, doi:10.1007/s10111-020-00633-0.
APA
Van Acker, B., Conradie, P., Vlerick, P., & Saldien, J. (2021). Employee acceptability of wearable mental workload monitoring : exploring effects of framing the goal and context in corporate communication. COGNITION TECHNOLOGY & WORK. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10111-020-00633-0
Chicago author-date
Van Acker, Bram, Peter Conradie, Peter Vlerick, and Jelle Saldien. 2021. “Employee Acceptability of Wearable Mental Workload Monitoring : Exploring Effects of Framing the Goal and Context in Corporate Communication.” COGNITION TECHNOLOGY & WORK. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10111-020-00633-0.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van Acker, Bram, Peter Conradie, Peter Vlerick, and Jelle Saldien. 2021. “Employee Acceptability of Wearable Mental Workload Monitoring : Exploring Effects of Framing the Goal and Context in Corporate Communication.” COGNITION TECHNOLOGY & WORK. doi:10.1007/s10111-020-00633-0.
Vancouver
1.
Van Acker B, Conradie P, Vlerick P, Saldien J. Employee acceptability of wearable mental workload monitoring : exploring effects of framing the goal and context in corporate communication. COGNITION TECHNOLOGY & WORK. 2021;
IEEE
[1]
B. Van Acker, P. Conradie, P. Vlerick, and J. Saldien, “Employee acceptability of wearable mental workload monitoring : exploring effects of framing the goal and context in corporate communication,” COGNITION TECHNOLOGY & WORK, 2021.
@article{8662834,
  abstract     = {{Development of wearable mental workload (MWL) measures thrives, especially as leveraged by Industry 4.0. When employees object to wearing such gauges; however, research efforts might end up redundant. Based on self-determination and communication theories, this study assumed that employees’ acceptability of wearable MWL-monitoring is shaped by
framing characteristics in corporate communication. Specifically, we hypothesized that acceptability depends on how (1)
the technology’s goals and (2) context of implementation is framed. A pilot study (N = 150) revealed that framing wearable
MWL-monitoring in terms of serving intrinsic goals (e.g., improving health) in an autonomy-supportive context (e.g.,
allowing discussion) induced a higher employee acceptability, compared to framing the technology in terms of serving
extrinsic goals (e.g., increasing productivity) in a controlling context (e.g., mandating use). A subsequent pre-registered
study (N = 350) could, however, not replicate this result. Instead, higher acceptability was associated with higher technology readiness, lower education levels, and being a woman (for the trust component of acceptability). Independent of conditions, mean acceptability, interestingly, panned out neutral. The current work is thereby the first exploring the complexities of employee acceptability of wearable MWL-monitoring and, based on open-ended questions, finally suggests that privacy management might be the most pivotal explanatory variable.}},
  author       = {{Van Acker, Bram and Conradie, Peter and Vlerick, Peter and Saldien, Jelle}},
  issn         = {{1435-5558}},
  journal      = {{COGNITION TECHNOLOGY & WORK}},
  keywords     = {{User acceptability,Corporate communication,Wearables,Mental workload,Self-determination theory,Industry 4.0,SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY,TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE,USER ACCEPTANCE,INFORMATION-TECHNOLOGY,AUTONOMY SUPPORT,AMERICAN-DREAM,MEDIATING ROLE,WORKPLACE,PERFORMANCE,HEALTH}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{16}},
  title        = {{Employee acceptability of wearable mental workload monitoring : exploring effects of framing the goal and context in corporate communication}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10111-020-00633-0}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: