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Articulation lost in space : the effects of local orobuccal anesthesia on articulation and intelligibility of phonemes

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Abstract
Motor speech requires numerous neural computations including feedforward and feedback control mechanisms. A reduction of auditory or somatosensory feedback may be implicated in disorders of speech, as predicted by various models of speech control. In this paper the effects of reduced somatosensory feedback on articulation and intelligibility of individual phonemes was evaluated by using topical anesthesia of orobuccal structures in 24 healthy subjects. The evaluation was done using a combination of perceptual intelligibility estimation of consonants and vowels and acoustic analysis of motor speech. A significantly reduced intelligibility was found, with a major impact on consonant formation. Acoustic analysis demonstrated disturbed diadochokinesis. These results underscore the clinical importance of somatosensory feedback in speech control. The interpretation of these findings in the context of speech control models, neuro-anatomy and clinical neurology may have implications for subtyping of dysarthria.
Keywords
Speech and Hearing, Linguistics and Language, Experimental and Cognitive Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Language and Linguistics, Motor speech, Feedback, Somatosensory, Intelligibility, Dysarthria, Cerebellum, Ataxia, SPEECH PRODUCTION, AUDITORY-FEEDBACK, MOTOR CONTROL, DYSARTHRIA, MECHANISMS, TACTILE

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MLA
De Letter, Miet, et al. “Articulation Lost in Space : The Effects of Local Orobuccal Anesthesia on Articulation and Intelligibility of Phonemes.” BRAIN AND LANGUAGE, vol. 207, 2020, doi:10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104813.
APA
De Letter, M., Criel, Y., Blindeman, A., Hartsuiker, R., & Santens, P. (2020). Articulation lost in space : the effects of local orobuccal anesthesia on articulation and intelligibility of phonemes. BRAIN AND LANGUAGE, 207. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104813
Chicago author-date
De Letter, Miet, Yana Criel, Andreas Blindeman, Robert Hartsuiker, and Patrick Santens. 2020. “Articulation Lost in Space : The Effects of Local Orobuccal Anesthesia on Articulation and Intelligibility of Phonemes.” BRAIN AND LANGUAGE 207. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104813.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Letter, Miet, Yana Criel, Andreas Blindeman, Robert Hartsuiker, and Patrick Santens. 2020. “Articulation Lost in Space : The Effects of Local Orobuccal Anesthesia on Articulation and Intelligibility of Phonemes.” BRAIN AND LANGUAGE 207. doi:10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104813.
Vancouver
1.
De Letter M, Criel Y, Blindeman A, Hartsuiker R, Santens P. Articulation lost in space : the effects of local orobuccal anesthesia on articulation and intelligibility of phonemes. BRAIN AND LANGUAGE. 2020;207.
IEEE
[1]
M. De Letter, Y. Criel, A. Blindeman, R. Hartsuiker, and P. Santens, “Articulation lost in space : the effects of local orobuccal anesthesia on articulation and intelligibility of phonemes,” BRAIN AND LANGUAGE, vol. 207, 2020.
@article{8662581,
  abstract     = {Motor speech requires numerous neural computations including feedforward and feedback control mechanisms. A reduction of auditory or somatosensory feedback may be implicated in disorders of speech, as predicted by various models of speech control. In this paper the effects of reduced somatosensory feedback on articulation and intelligibility of individual phonemes was evaluated by using topical anesthesia of orobuccal structures in 24 healthy subjects. The evaluation was done using a combination of perceptual intelligibility estimation of consonants and vowels and acoustic analysis of motor speech. A significantly reduced intelligibility was found, with a major impact on consonant formation. Acoustic analysis demonstrated disturbed diadochokinesis. These results underscore the clinical importance of somatosensory feedback in speech control. The interpretation of these findings in the context of speech control models, neuro-anatomy and clinical neurology may have implications for subtyping of dysarthria.},
  articleno    = {104813},
  author       = {De Letter, Miet and Criel, Yana and Blindeman, Andreas and Hartsuiker, Robert and Santens, Patrick},
  issn         = {0093-934X},
  journal      = {BRAIN AND LANGUAGE},
  keywords     = {Speech and Hearing,Linguistics and Language,Experimental and Cognitive Psychology,Cognitive Neuroscience,Language and Linguistics,Motor speech,Feedback,Somatosensory,Intelligibility,Dysarthria,Cerebellum,Ataxia,SPEECH PRODUCTION,AUDITORY-FEEDBACK,MOTOR CONTROL,DYSARTHRIA,MECHANISMS,TACTILE},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {7},
  title        = {Articulation lost in space : the effects of local orobuccal anesthesia on articulation and intelligibility of phonemes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104813},
  volume       = {207},
  year         = {2020},
}

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