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Disclosure of vlog advertising targeted to children

Steffi De Jans (UGent) and Liselot Hudders (UGent)
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Abstract
Influencers can disclose vlog advertising by implementing a platform-generated disclosure or by generating their own disclosure. This study aims to investigate whether and how these two types of disclosures differentially affect children's responses toward the sponsored content and the influencer. To do so, a two (platform-generated [PG] disclosure: no PG disclosure versus PG disclosure) by three (influencer-generated [IG] disclosure: no IG disclosure versus no commercial interference disclosure versus commercial interference disclosure) between-subjects experimental study was conducted among 190 children (aged ten to twelve). The results show that both types of disclosures increased children's recognition of vlog advertising; however, children's advertising literacy (i.e. their understanding of influencer marketing and skepticism toward the ad) was less activated when the influencer specifically indicated that there was no commercial interference of the brand. In addition, besides being more beneficial for influencers (by not negatively affecting children's evaluations of the influencer), an IG disclosure also showed to be more favorable for brands, as it increased brand effects among children, whereas a PG disclosure decreased these brand effects.
Keywords
Marketing, Business and International Management, Influencer marketing, Vlog advertising, Advertising disclosures, Advertising literacy, Influencer-generated disclosure, Influencer effects, Brand effects, WORD-OF-MOUTH, PERSUASION KNOWLEDGE, SPONSORSHIP DISCLOSURE, BRAND PLACEMENT, MODERATING ROLE, ADVERGAMES, IMPACT, ADOLESCENTS, VALIDATION, FOLLOWERS

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MLA
De Jans, Steffi, and Liselot Hudders. “Disclosure of Vlog Advertising Targeted to Children.” JOURNAL OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING, vol. 52, 2020, pp. 1–19, doi:10.1016/j.intmar.2020.03.003.
APA
De Jans, S., & Hudders, L. (2020). Disclosure of vlog advertising targeted to children. JOURNAL OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING, 52, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intmar.2020.03.003
Chicago author-date
De Jans, Steffi, and Liselot Hudders. 2020. “Disclosure of Vlog Advertising Targeted to Children.” JOURNAL OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING 52: 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intmar.2020.03.003.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Jans, Steffi, and Liselot Hudders. 2020. “Disclosure of Vlog Advertising Targeted to Children.” JOURNAL OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING 52: 1–19. doi:10.1016/j.intmar.2020.03.003.
Vancouver
1.
De Jans S, Hudders L. Disclosure of vlog advertising targeted to children. JOURNAL OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING. 2020;52:1–19.
IEEE
[1]
S. De Jans and L. Hudders, “Disclosure of vlog advertising targeted to children,” JOURNAL OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING, vol. 52, pp. 1–19, 2020.
@article{8662573,
  abstract     = {{Influencers can disclose vlog advertising by implementing a platform-generated disclosure or by generating their own disclosure. This study aims to investigate whether and how these two types of disclosures differentially affect children's responses toward the sponsored content and the influencer. To do so, a two (platform-generated [PG] disclosure: no PG disclosure versus PG disclosure) by three (influencer-generated [IG] disclosure: no IG disclosure versus no commercial interference disclosure versus commercial interference disclosure) between-subjects experimental study was conducted among 190 children (aged ten to twelve). The results show that both types of disclosures increased children's recognition of vlog advertising; however, children's advertising literacy (i.e. their understanding of influencer marketing and skepticism toward the ad) was less activated when the influencer specifically indicated that there was no commercial interference of the brand. In addition, besides being more beneficial for influencers (by not negatively affecting children's evaluations of the influencer), an IG disclosure also showed to be more favorable for brands, as it increased brand effects among children, whereas a PG disclosure decreased these brand effects.}},
  author       = {{De Jans, Steffi and Hudders, Liselot}},
  issn         = {{1094-9968}},
  journal      = {{JOURNAL OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING}},
  keywords     = {{Marketing,Business and International Management,Influencer marketing,Vlog advertising,Advertising disclosures,Advertising literacy,Influencer-generated disclosure,Influencer effects,Brand effects,WORD-OF-MOUTH,PERSUASION KNOWLEDGE,SPONSORSHIP DISCLOSURE,BRAND PLACEMENT,MODERATING ROLE,ADVERGAMES,IMPACT,ADOLESCENTS,VALIDATION,FOLLOWERS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{1--19}},
  title        = {{Disclosure of vlog advertising targeted to children}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intmar.2020.03.003}},
  volume       = {{52}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}

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