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Do different habits affect microplastics contents in organisms? A trait-based analysis on salt marsh species

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Abstract
Salt marshes in urban watersheds are prone to microplastics (MP) pollution due to their hydrological characteristics and exposure to urban runoff, but little is known about MP distributions in species from these habitats. In the current study, MP occurrence was determined in six benthic invertebrate species from salt marshes along the North Adriatic lagoons (Italy) and the Schelde estuary (Netherlands). The species represented different feeding modes and sediment localisation. 96% of the analysed specimens (330) did not contain any MP, which was consistent across different regions and sites. Suspension and facultative deposit-feeding bivalves exhibited a lower MP occurrence (0.5–3%) relative to omnivores (95%) but contained a much more variable distribution of MP sizes, shapes and polymers. The study provides indications that MP physicochemical properties and species' ecological traits could all influence MP exposure, uptake and retention in benthic organisms inhabiting European salt marsh ecosystems.
Keywords
Aquatic Science, Pollution, Oceanography, Microplastics, Fibres, Suspension-feeders, Deposit-feeders, Omnivores, Salt marsh, MYTILUS-EDULIS, SPATIAL-PATTERNS, PLASTIC DEBRIS, INGESTION, SEDIMENTS, MUSSELS, CONTAMINATION, ACCUMULATION, DEGRADATION, POLYSTYRENE

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MLA
Piarulli, Stefania, et al. “Do Different Habits Affect Microplastics Contents in Organisms? A Trait-Based Analysis on Salt Marsh Species.” MARINE POLLUTION BULLETIN, vol. 153, 2020, doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.110983.
APA
Piarulli, S., Vanhove, B., Comandini, P., Scapinello, S., Moens, T., Vrielinck, H., … Airoldi, L. (2020). Do different habits affect microplastics contents in organisms? A trait-based analysis on salt marsh species. MARINE POLLUTION BULLETIN, 153. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.110983
Chicago author-date
Piarulli, Stefania, Brecht Vanhove, Paolo Comandini, Sara Scapinello, Tom Moens, Henk Vrielinck, Giorgia Sciutto, et al. 2020. “Do Different Habits Affect Microplastics Contents in Organisms? A Trait-Based Analysis on Salt Marsh Species.” MARINE POLLUTION BULLETIN 153. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.110983.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Piarulli, Stefania, Brecht Vanhove, Paolo Comandini, Sara Scapinello, Tom Moens, Henk Vrielinck, Giorgia Sciutto, Silvia Prati, Rocco Mazzeo, Andy M. Booth, Carl Van Colen, and Laura Airoldi. 2020. “Do Different Habits Affect Microplastics Contents in Organisms? A Trait-Based Analysis on Salt Marsh Species.” MARINE POLLUTION BULLETIN 153. doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.110983.
Vancouver
1.
Piarulli S, Vanhove B, Comandini P, Scapinello S, Moens T, Vrielinck H, et al. Do different habits affect microplastics contents in organisms? A trait-based analysis on salt marsh species. MARINE POLLUTION BULLETIN. 2020;153.
IEEE
[1]
S. Piarulli et al., “Do different habits affect microplastics contents in organisms? A trait-based analysis on salt marsh species,” MARINE POLLUTION BULLETIN, vol. 153, 2020.
@article{8661929,
  abstract     = {{Salt marshes in urban watersheds are prone to microplastics (MP) pollution due to their hydrological characteristics and exposure to urban runoff, but little is known about MP distributions in species from these habitats. In the current study, MP occurrence was determined in six benthic invertebrate species from salt marshes along the North Adriatic lagoons (Italy) and the Schelde estuary (Netherlands). The species represented different feeding modes and sediment localisation. 96% of the analysed specimens (330) did not contain any MP, which was consistent across different regions and sites.

Suspension and facultative deposit-feeding bivalves exhibited a lower MP occurrence (0.5–3%) relative to omnivores (95%) but contained a much more variable distribution of MP sizes, shapes and polymers. The study provides indications that MP physicochemical properties and species' ecological traits could all influence MP exposure, uptake and retention in benthic organisms inhabiting European salt marsh ecosystems.}},
  articleno    = {{110983}},
  author       = {{Piarulli, Stefania and Vanhove, Brecht and Comandini, Paolo and Scapinello, Sara and Moens, Tom and Vrielinck, Henk and Sciutto, Giorgia and Prati, Silvia and Mazzeo, Rocco and Booth, Andy M. and Van Colen, Carl and Airoldi, Laura}},
  issn         = {{0025-326X}},
  journal      = {{MARINE POLLUTION BULLETIN}},
  keywords     = {{Aquatic Science,Pollution,Oceanography,Microplastics,Fibres,Suspension-feeders,Deposit-feeders,Omnivores,Salt marsh,MYTILUS-EDULIS,SPATIAL-PATTERNS,PLASTIC DEBRIS,INGESTION,SEDIMENTS,MUSSELS,CONTAMINATION,ACCUMULATION,DEGRADATION,POLYSTYRENE}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{9}},
  title        = {{Do different habits affect microplastics contents in organisms? A trait-based analysis on salt marsh species}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.110983}},
  volume       = {{153}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}

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