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Early interpersonal trauma reduces temporoparietal junction activity during spontaneous mentalising

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Abstract
Experience of interpersonal trauma and violence alters self-other distinction and mentalising abilities (also known as theory of mind, or ToM), yet little is known about their neural correlates. This fMRI study assessed temporoparietal junction (TPJ) activation, an area strongly implicated in interpersonal processing, during spontaneous mentalising in 35 adult women with histories of childhood physical, sexual, and/or emotional abuse (childhood abuse; CA) and 31 women without such experiences (unaffected comparisons; UC). Participants watched movies during which an agent formed true or false beliefs about the location of a ball, while participants always knew the true location of the ball. As hypothesised, right TPJ activation was greater for UCs compared to CAs for false vs true belief conditions. In addition, CAs showed increased functional connectivity relative to UCs between the rTPJ and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. Finally, the agent’s belief about the presence of the ball influenced participants’ responses (ToM index), but without group differences. These findings highlight that experiencing early interpersonal trauma can alter brain areas involved in the neural processing of ToM and perspective-taking during adulthood.
Keywords
Experimental and Cognitive Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, General Medicine, childhood abuse, mentalising, temporoparietal junction (TPJ), theory of mind (ToM), trauma, CHILDHOOD TRAUMA, SOCIAL SUPPORT, PERSPECTIVE-TAKING, DISORDER, OTHERS, ABUSE, MIND, MALTREATMENT, RELIABILITY, PERFORMANCE

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Cracco, Emiel, et al. “Early Interpersonal Trauma Reduces Temporoparietal Junction Activity during Spontaneous Mentalising.” SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE, vol. 15, no. 1, 2020, pp. 12–22, doi:10.1093/scan/nsaa015.
APA
Cracco, E., Hudson, A., Van Hamme, C., Maeyens, L., Brass, M., & Müller, S. (2020). Early interpersonal trauma reduces temporoparietal junction activity during spontaneous mentalising. SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE, 15(1), 12–22. https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsaa015
Chicago author-date
Cracco, Emiel, Anna Hudson, Charlotte Van Hamme, Lien Maeyens, Marcel Brass, and Sven Müller. 2020. “Early Interpersonal Trauma Reduces Temporoparietal Junction Activity during Spontaneous Mentalising.” SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE 15 (1): 12–22. https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsaa015.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Cracco, Emiel, Anna Hudson, Charlotte Van Hamme, Lien Maeyens, Marcel Brass, and Sven Müller. 2020. “Early Interpersonal Trauma Reduces Temporoparietal Junction Activity during Spontaneous Mentalising.” SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE 15 (1): 12–22. doi:10.1093/scan/nsaa015.
Vancouver
1.
Cracco E, Hudson A, Van Hamme C, Maeyens L, Brass M, Müller S. Early interpersonal trauma reduces temporoparietal junction activity during spontaneous mentalising. SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE. 2020;15(1):12–22.
IEEE
[1]
E. Cracco, A. Hudson, C. Van Hamme, L. Maeyens, M. Brass, and S. Müller, “Early interpersonal trauma reduces temporoparietal junction activity during spontaneous mentalising,” SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 12–22, 2020.
@article{8660850,
  abstract     = {Experience of interpersonal trauma and violence alters self-other distinction and mentalising abilities (also known as theory of mind, or ToM), yet little is known about their neural correlates. This fMRI study assessed temporoparietal junction (TPJ) activation, an area strongly implicated in interpersonal processing, during spontaneous mentalising in 35 adult women with histories of childhood physical, sexual, and/or emotional abuse (childhood abuse; CA) and 31 women without such experiences (unaffected comparisons; UC). Participants watched movies during which an agent formed true or false beliefs about the location of a ball, while participants always knew the true location of the ball. As hypothesised, right TPJ activation was greater for UCs compared to CAs for false vs true belief conditions. In addition, CAs showed increased functional connectivity relative to UCs between the rTPJ and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. Finally, the agent’s belief about the presence of the ball influenced participants’ responses (ToM index), but without group differences. These findings highlight that experiencing early interpersonal trauma can alter brain areas involved in the neural processing of ToM and perspective-taking during adulthood.},
  author       = {Cracco, Emiel and Hudson, Anna and Van Hamme, Charlotte and Maeyens, Lien and Brass, Marcel and Müller, Sven},
  issn         = {1749-5016},
  journal      = {SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE},
  keywords     = {Experimental and Cognitive Psychology,Cognitive Neuroscience,General Medicine,childhood abuse,mentalising,temporoparietal junction (TPJ),theory of mind (ToM),trauma,CHILDHOOD TRAUMA,SOCIAL SUPPORT,PERSPECTIVE-TAKING,DISORDER,OTHERS,ABUSE,MIND,MALTREATMENT,RELIABILITY,PERFORMANCE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {12--22},
  title        = {Early interpersonal trauma reduces temporoparietal junction activity during spontaneous mentalising},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsaa015},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2020},
}

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