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Why journalists covered Syria the way they did : on the role of economic, social and cultural capital

(2017) JOURNALISM. 18(5). p.609-625
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Abstract
While recent decades have seen the rise of a vast body of work on war reporting, there have been few sociological explanations of why journalists deal with challenging situations in particular ways. This article contributes to bridging the gap between practice-based studies of war reporting and general sociological studies of journalism as a profession, by providing a systematically sociological account of the factors that influenced how the Syrian conflict was covered by Dutch and Flemish reporters working for a wide range of media. In doing so, this article draws on 13 in-depth interviews with those reporters, which is informed by a content analysis of their work, and Pierre Bourdieu’s concepts of economic, social and cultural capital on both an institutional and an individual level. In addition, it is argued that Bourdieusian analyses may be developed further by distinguishing between endogenous and exogenous forms of cultural capital.
Keywords
Journalistic practices, Middle East, Pierre Bourdieu, sociology of journalism, Syria, war journalism, MEDIA, SOCIOLOGY, FIELD, WAR

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MLA
Vandevoordt, Robin. “Why Journalists Covered Syria the Way They Did : On the Role of Economic, Social and Cultural Capital.” JOURNALISM, vol. 18, no. 5, 2017, pp. 609–25, doi:10.1177/1464884915620271.
APA
Vandevoordt, R. (2017). Why journalists covered Syria the way they did : on the role of economic, social and cultural capital. JOURNALISM, 18(5), 609–625. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884915620271
Chicago author-date
Vandevoordt, Robin. 2017. “Why Journalists Covered Syria the Way They Did : On the Role of Economic, Social and Cultural Capital.” JOURNALISM 18 (5): 609–25. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884915620271.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vandevoordt, Robin. 2017. “Why Journalists Covered Syria the Way They Did : On the Role of Economic, Social and Cultural Capital.” JOURNALISM 18 (5): 609–625. doi:10.1177/1464884915620271.
Vancouver
1.
Vandevoordt R. Why journalists covered Syria the way they did : on the role of economic, social and cultural capital. JOURNALISM. 2017;18(5):609–25.
IEEE
[1]
R. Vandevoordt, “Why journalists covered Syria the way they did : on the role of economic, social and cultural capital,” JOURNALISM, vol. 18, no. 5, pp. 609–625, 2017.
@article{8659931,
  abstract     = {While recent decades have seen the rise of a vast body of work on war reporting, there have been few sociological explanations of why journalists deal with challenging situations in particular ways. This article contributes to bridging the gap between practice-based studies of war reporting and general sociological studies of journalism as a profession, by providing a systematically sociological account of the factors that influenced how the Syrian conflict was covered by Dutch and Flemish reporters working for a wide range of media. In doing so, this article draws on 13 in-depth interviews with those reporters, which is informed by a content analysis of their work, and Pierre Bourdieu’s concepts of economic, social and cultural capital on both an institutional and an individual level. In addition, it is argued that Bourdieusian analyses may be developed further by distinguishing between endogenous and exogenous forms of cultural capital.},
  author       = {Vandevoordt, Robin},
  issn         = {1464-8849},
  journal      = {JOURNALISM},
  keywords     = {Journalistic practices,Middle East,Pierre Bourdieu,sociology of journalism,Syria,war journalism,MEDIA,SOCIOLOGY,FIELD,WAR},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {609--625},
  title        = {Why journalists covered Syria the way they did : on the role of economic, social and cultural capital},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1464884915620271},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2017},
}

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