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Weight-gain induced changes in renal perfusion assessed by contrast-enhanced ultrasound precede increases in urinary protein excretion suggestive of glomerular and tubular injury and normalize after weight-loss in dogs

Daisy Liu, Emmelie Stock (UGent) , Bart Broeckx (UGent) , Sylvie Daminet (UGent) , Evelyne Meyer (UGent) , Joris Delanghe (UGent) , Siska Croubels (UGent) , Mathias Devreese (UGent) , Patrick Nguyen, Evelien Bogaerts (UGent) , et al.
(2020) PLOS ONE. 15(4).
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Abstract
Early detection of obesity-related glomerulopathy in humans is challenging as it might not be detected by routine biomarkers of kidney function. This study's aim was to use novel kidney biomarkers and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to evaluate the effect of obesity development and weight-loss on kidney function, perfusion, and injury in dogs. Sixteen healthy lean adult beagles were assigned randomly but age-matched to a control group (CG) (n = 8) fed to maintain a lean body weight (BW) for 83 weeks; or to a weight-change group (WCG) (n = 8) fed the same diet to induce obesity (week 0-47), to maintain stable obese weight (week 47-56) and to lose BW (week 56-83). At 8 time points, values of systolic blood pressure (sBP); serum creatinine (sCr); blood urea nitrogen (BUN); serum cystatin C (sCysC); urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UPC); and urinary biomarkers of glomerular and tubular injury were measured. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal perfusion using CEUS were assayed (except for week 68). For CEUS, intensity- and time-related parameters representing blood volume and velocity were derived from imaging data, respectively. At 12-22% weight-gain, cortical time-to-peak, representing blood velocity, was shorter in the WCG vs. the CG. After 37% weight-gain, sCysC, UPC, glomerular and tubular biomarkers of injury, urinary immunoglobulin G and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, respectively, were higher in the WCG. sBP, sCr, BUN and GFR were not significantly different. After 23% weight-loss, all alterations were attenuated. Early weight-gain in dogs induced renal perfusion changes measured with CEUS, without hyperfiltration, preceding increased urinary protein excretion with potential glomerular and tubular injury. The combined use of routine biomarkers of kidney function, CEUS and site-specific urinary biomarkers might be valuable in assessing kidney health of individuals at risk for obesity-related glomerulopathy in a non-invasive manner.
Keywords
General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences, General Medicine

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MLA
Liu, Daisy, et al. “Weight-Gain Induced Changes in Renal Perfusion Assessed by Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Precede Increases in Urinary Protein Excretion Suggestive of Glomerular and Tubular Injury and Normalize after Weight-Loss in Dogs.” PLOS ONE, edited by Jaap A. Joles, vol. 15, no. 4, 2020, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0231662.
APA
Liu, D., Stock, E., Broeckx, B., Daminet, S., Meyer, E., Delanghe, J., … Vanderperren, K. (2020). Weight-gain induced changes in renal perfusion assessed by contrast-enhanced ultrasound precede increases in urinary protein excretion suggestive of glomerular and tubular injury and normalize after weight-loss in dogs. PLOS ONE, 15(4). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0231662
Chicago author-date
Liu, Daisy, Emmelie Stock, Bart Broeckx, Sylvie Daminet, Evelyne Meyer, Joris Delanghe, Siska Croubels, et al. 2020. “Weight-Gain Induced Changes in Renal Perfusion Assessed by Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Precede Increases in Urinary Protein Excretion Suggestive of Glomerular and Tubular Injury and Normalize after Weight-Loss in Dogs.” Edited by Jaap A. Joles. PLOS ONE 15 (4). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0231662.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Liu, Daisy, Emmelie Stock, Bart Broeckx, Sylvie Daminet, Evelyne Meyer, Joris Delanghe, Siska Croubels, Mathias Devreese, Patrick Nguyen, Evelien Bogaerts, Myriam Hesta, and Katrien Vanderperren. 2020. “Weight-Gain Induced Changes in Renal Perfusion Assessed by Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Precede Increases in Urinary Protein Excretion Suggestive of Glomerular and Tubular Injury and Normalize after Weight-Loss in Dogs.” Ed by. Jaap A. Joles. PLOS ONE 15 (4). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0231662.
Vancouver
1.
Liu D, Stock E, Broeckx B, Daminet S, Meyer E, Delanghe J, et al. Weight-gain induced changes in renal perfusion assessed by contrast-enhanced ultrasound precede increases in urinary protein excretion suggestive of glomerular and tubular injury and normalize after weight-loss in dogs. Joles JA, editor. PLOS ONE. 2020;15(4).
IEEE
[1]
D. Liu et al., “Weight-gain induced changes in renal perfusion assessed by contrast-enhanced ultrasound precede increases in urinary protein excretion suggestive of glomerular and tubular injury and normalize after weight-loss in dogs,” PLOS ONE, vol. 15, no. 4, 2020.
@article{8659487,
  abstract     = {{Early detection of obesity-related glomerulopathy in humans is challenging as it might not be detected by routine biomarkers of kidney function. This study's aim was to use novel kidney biomarkers and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to evaluate the effect of obesity development and weight-loss on kidney function, perfusion, and injury in dogs. Sixteen healthy lean adult beagles were assigned randomly but age-matched to a control group (CG) (n = 8) fed to maintain a lean body weight (BW) for 83 weeks; or to a weight-change group (WCG) (n = 8) fed the same diet to induce obesity (week 0-47), to maintain stable obese weight (week 47-56) and to lose BW (week 56-83). At 8 time points, values of systolic blood pressure (sBP); serum creatinine (sCr); blood urea nitrogen (BUN); serum cystatin C (sCysC); urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UPC); and urinary biomarkers of glomerular and tubular injury were measured. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal perfusion using CEUS were assayed (except for week 68). For CEUS, intensity- and time-related parameters representing blood volume and velocity were derived from imaging data, respectively. At 12-22% weight-gain, cortical time-to-peak, representing blood velocity, was shorter in the WCG vs. the CG. After 37% weight-gain, sCysC, UPC, glomerular and tubular biomarkers of injury, urinary immunoglobulin G and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, respectively, were higher in the WCG. sBP, sCr, BUN and GFR were not significantly different. After 23% weight-loss, all alterations were attenuated. Early weight-gain in dogs induced renal perfusion changes measured with CEUS, without hyperfiltration, preceding increased urinary protein excretion with potential glomerular and tubular injury. The combined use of routine biomarkers of kidney function, CEUS and site-specific urinary biomarkers might be valuable in assessing kidney health of individuals at risk for obesity-related glomerulopathy in a non-invasive manner.}},
  articleno    = {{e0231662}},
  author       = {{Liu, Daisy and Stock, Emmelie and Broeckx, Bart and Daminet, Sylvie and Meyer, Evelyne and Delanghe, Joris and Croubels, Siska and Devreese, Mathias and Nguyen, Patrick and Bogaerts, Evelien and Hesta, Myriam and Vanderperren, Katrien}},
  editor       = {{Joles, Jaap A.}},
  issn         = {{1932-6203}},
  journal      = {{PLOS ONE}},
  keywords     = {{General Biochemistry,Genetics and Molecular Biology,General Agricultural and Biological Sciences,General Medicine}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{4}},
  pages        = {{20}},
  title        = {{Weight-gain induced changes in renal perfusion assessed by contrast-enhanced ultrasound precede increases in urinary protein excretion suggestive of glomerular and tubular injury and normalize after weight-loss in dogs}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0231662}},
  volume       = {{15}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}

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