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Knowledge as a strategy for privacy protection : how a privacy literacy training affects children's online disclosure behavior

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Abstract
While spending significant time on the Internet, children are often exposed to data disclosure requests from e-service providers. However, they are not always aware of the commercial value of their data, and they often struggle to understand the associated privacy risks. At the same time, scholars have stressed the importance of such knowledge in the adaptation of privacy-protective behavior. This study investigates how privacy literacy training can increase children's (aged 9-13 years) privacy literacy, influence their online disclosure behavior, and affect their privacy concern with regard to different levels of privacy costs (low versus high). Two online experiments (N = 214 and N = 366, respectively) showed that training enhances children's general understanding of data practices and helps children to better protect their privacy, including holding back and fabricating personal information, as well as to identify low privacy risks. The findings also suggested that enhanced privacy literacy evokes more negative brand responses. As one of the first studies to investigate disclosure behavior among young children, this study provides a more comprehensive understanding of how children cope with their online privacy and proposes important implications for policymakers and educators.
Keywords
Human-Computer Interaction, Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous), General Psychology, Privacy literacy, Training, Disclosure behavior, Children, Commercial data practices, Online privacy, ADVERTISING LITERACY, PERSONAL INFORMATION, INSTITUTIONAL TRUST, PARENTAL MEDIATION, RESPONSES, USERS, ANTECEDENTS, INCENTIVES, INTENTION, ATTITUDES

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MLA
Desimpelaere, Laurien, et al. “Knowledge as a Strategy for Privacy Protection : How a Privacy Literacy Training Affects Children’s Online Disclosure Behavior.” COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR, vol. 110, 2020, doi:10.1016/j.chb.2020.106382.
APA
Desimpelaere, L., Hudders, L., & Van de Sompel, D. (2020). Knowledge as a strategy for privacy protection : how a privacy literacy training affects children’s online disclosure behavior. COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR, 110. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2020.106382
Chicago author-date
Desimpelaere, Laurien, Liselot Hudders, and Dieneke Van de Sompel. 2020. “Knowledge as a Strategy for Privacy Protection : How a Privacy Literacy Training Affects Children’s Online Disclosure Behavior.” COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR 110. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2020.106382.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Desimpelaere, Laurien, Liselot Hudders, and Dieneke Van de Sompel. 2020. “Knowledge as a Strategy for Privacy Protection : How a Privacy Literacy Training Affects Children’s Online Disclosure Behavior.” COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR 110. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2020.106382.
Vancouver
1.
Desimpelaere L, Hudders L, Van de Sompel D. Knowledge as a strategy for privacy protection : how a privacy literacy training affects children’s online disclosure behavior. COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR. 2020;110.
IEEE
[1]
L. Desimpelaere, L. Hudders, and D. Van de Sompel, “Knowledge as a strategy for privacy protection : how a privacy literacy training affects children’s online disclosure behavior,” COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR, vol. 110, 2020.
@article{8659249,
  abstract     = {{While spending significant time on the Internet, children are often exposed to data disclosure requests from e-service providers. However, they are not always aware of the commercial value of their data, and they often struggle to understand the associated privacy risks. At the same time, scholars have stressed the importance of such knowledge in the adaptation of privacy-protective behavior. This study investigates how privacy literacy training can increase children's (aged 9-13 years) privacy literacy, influence their online disclosure behavior, and affect their privacy concern with regard to different levels of privacy costs (low versus high). Two online experiments (N = 214 and N = 366, respectively) showed that training enhances children's general understanding of data practices and helps children to better protect their privacy, including holding back and fabricating personal information, as well as to identify low privacy risks. The findings also suggested that enhanced privacy literacy evokes more negative brand responses. As one of the first studies to investigate disclosure behavior among young children, this study provides a more comprehensive understanding of how children cope with their online privacy and proposes important implications for policymakers and educators.}},
  articleno    = {{106382}},
  author       = {{Desimpelaere, Laurien and Hudders, Liselot and Van de Sompel, Dieneke}},
  issn         = {{0747-5632}},
  journal      = {{COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR}},
  keywords     = {{Human-Computer Interaction,Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous),General Psychology,Privacy literacy,Training,Disclosure behavior,Children,Commercial data practices,Online privacy,ADVERTISING LITERACY,PERSONAL INFORMATION,INSTITUTIONAL TRUST,PARENTAL MEDIATION,RESPONSES,USERS,ANTECEDENTS,INCENTIVES,INTENTION,ATTITUDES}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{12}},
  title        = {{Knowledge as a strategy for privacy protection : how a privacy literacy training affects children's online disclosure behavior}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2020.106382}},
  volume       = {{110}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}

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