Advanced search
1 file | 2.06 MB Add to list

Cycling for a sustainable future : stimulating children to cycle to school via a synergetic combination of informational and behavioral interventions

(2020) SUSTAINABILITY. 12(8).
Author
Organization
Abstract
This paper explores how communication interventions can be designed to motivate children to choose more sustainable commuting options (cycling) to go to school. One-hundred and eighty-six children (between 8 and 11 years old) from Flanders, Belgium, participated in an intervention study testing the effectiveness of using informative versus behavioral interventions and the moderating role of motivational messages. The study employed a between-subjects research design with 3 types of interventions (informational versus behavioral versus a combination of informational and behavioral interventions) and 2 types of motivation (autonomous versus controlled motivation). Findings revealed that the average change in the number of times the child indicated to commute by cycling was biggest after being exposed to a combination of informational and behavioral interventions. The type of motivation (autonomous versus controlled) did not have an impact on the average change in the number of times the child indicated to commute by cycling, nor moderated these effects. Additionally, including age and gender as covariates in the model did not alter the results. The study’s findings provide more insights in how sustainable commuting can be promoted among children. It shows the benefits of combining informational and behavioral interventions in public awareness programs (such as in schools).
Keywords
sustainable transportation, children’s sustainable behavior, persuasive communication, educational campaigns, nudging, SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY, MOTIVATION, NUDGES, PERFORMANCE, BICYCLE

Downloads

  • sustainability-12-03224 1 .pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 2.06 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Van de Sompel, Dieneke, et al. “Cycling for a Sustainable Future : Stimulating Children to Cycle to School via a Synergetic Combination of Informational and Behavioral Interventions.” SUSTAINABILITY, vol. 12, no. 8, 2020, doi:10.3390/su12083224.
APA
Van de Sompel, D., Vandenberghe, L., & Hudders, L. (2020). Cycling for a sustainable future : stimulating children to cycle to school via a synergetic combination of informational and behavioral interventions. SUSTAINABILITY, 12(8). https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083224
Chicago author-date
Van de Sompel, Dieneke, Lore Vandenberghe, and Liselot Hudders. 2020. “Cycling for a Sustainable Future : Stimulating Children to Cycle to School via a Synergetic Combination of Informational and Behavioral Interventions.” SUSTAINABILITY 12 (8). https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083224.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van de Sompel, Dieneke, Lore Vandenberghe, and Liselot Hudders. 2020. “Cycling for a Sustainable Future : Stimulating Children to Cycle to School via a Synergetic Combination of Informational and Behavioral Interventions.” SUSTAINABILITY 12 (8). doi:10.3390/su12083224.
Vancouver
1.
Van de Sompel D, Vandenberghe L, Hudders L. Cycling for a sustainable future : stimulating children to cycle to school via a synergetic combination of informational and behavioral interventions. SUSTAINABILITY. 2020;12(8).
IEEE
[1]
D. Van de Sompel, L. Vandenberghe, and L. Hudders, “Cycling for a sustainable future : stimulating children to cycle to school via a synergetic combination of informational and behavioral interventions,” SUSTAINABILITY, vol. 12, no. 8, 2020.
@article{8658921,
  abstract     = {{This paper explores how communication interventions can be designed to motivate children to choose more sustainable commuting options (cycling) to go to school. One-hundred and eighty-six children (between 8 and 11 years old) from Flanders, Belgium, participated in an intervention study testing the effectiveness of using informative versus behavioral interventions and the moderating role of motivational messages. The study employed a between-subjects research design with 3 types of interventions (informational versus behavioral versus a combination of informational and behavioral interventions) and 2 types of motivation (autonomous versus controlled motivation). Findings revealed that the average change in the number of times the child indicated to commute by cycling was biggest after being exposed to a combination of informational and behavioral interventions. The type of motivation (autonomous versus controlled) did not have an impact on the average change in the number of times the child indicated to commute by cycling, nor moderated these effects. Additionally, including age and gender as covariates in the model did not alter the results. The study’s findings provide more insights in how sustainable commuting can be promoted among children. It shows the benefits of combining informational and behavioral interventions in public awareness programs (such as in schools).}},
  articleno    = {{3224}},
  author       = {{Van de Sompel, Dieneke and Vandenberghe, Lore and Hudders, Liselot}},
  issn         = {{2071-1050}},
  journal      = {{SUSTAINABILITY}},
  keywords     = {{sustainable transportation,children’s sustainable behavior,persuasive communication,educational campaigns,nudging,SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY,MOTIVATION,NUDGES,PERFORMANCE,BICYCLE}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{8}},
  pages        = {{18}},
  title        = {{Cycling for a sustainable future : stimulating children to cycle to school via a synergetic combination of informational and behavioral interventions}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/su12083224}},
  volume       = {{12}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: