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The past, present and future of pulmonary rehabilitation

(2019) RESPIROLOGY. 24(9). p.830-837
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Abstract
Abundant evidence supports the use of pulmonary rehabilitation as a treatment for stable and exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Several questions around the science base of rehabilitation in other patient groups as well as the role of rehabilitation as a component in other comprehensive care trajectories remain to be addressed. The impact of a rehabilitation programme could also perhaps be enhanced if clear guidance would be available on how to individualize the components of a rehabilitation programme in individual patients. The rehabilitation community, in an attempt to increase access to programmes, has developed less rigorous interventions. These may serve specific patients (e.g. less severe patients or may be used as a maintenance programme), but in order to have conceptual clarity they should not be called substitutes for rehabilitation if they do not meet the definition of rehabilitation. Reaching clarity on the best format for maintenance programmes in order to achieve long-lasting health benefits for patients is another challenge. Furthermore, as many patients as possible should be referred to adequate rehabilitation programmes within their reach with fair reimbursement. Programmes should take into account the burden of the disease of a patient, the required components to tackle the problems, adequate assessment to document the outcome and the patient's preference. In summary, pulmonary rehabilitation is one of the most potent evidence-based therapies for patients with respiratory diseases. Researchers should continue to fine tune the interventions, get clarity on terminology as well as the ultimate outcomes for rehabilitation to ensure sustainable health effects.
Keywords
QUALITY-OF-LIFE, RESPIRATORY SOCIETY STATEMENT, HOME-BASED, TELEREHABILITATION, RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL, PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY, EXERCISE, COPD, DISEASE, COMMUNITY, IMPROVES, pulmonary rehabilitation, COPD, physical activity, exercise

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Citation

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MLA
Troosters, Thierry, et al. “The Past, Present and Future of Pulmonary Rehabilitation.” RESPIROLOGY, vol. 24, no. 9, 2019, pp. 830–37, doi:10.1111/resp.13517.
APA
Troosters, T., Blondeel, A., Janssens, W., & Demeyer, H. (2019). The past, present and future of pulmonary rehabilitation. RESPIROLOGY, 24(9), 830–837. https://doi.org/10.1111/resp.13517
Chicago author-date
Troosters, Thierry, Astrid Blondeel, Wim Janssens, and Heleen Demeyer. 2019. “The Past, Present and Future of Pulmonary Rehabilitation.” RESPIROLOGY 24 (9): 830–37. https://doi.org/10.1111/resp.13517.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Troosters, Thierry, Astrid Blondeel, Wim Janssens, and Heleen Demeyer. 2019. “The Past, Present and Future of Pulmonary Rehabilitation.” RESPIROLOGY 24 (9): 830–837. doi:10.1111/resp.13517.
Vancouver
1.
Troosters T, Blondeel A, Janssens W, Demeyer H. The past, present and future of pulmonary rehabilitation. RESPIROLOGY. 2019;24(9):830–7.
IEEE
[1]
T. Troosters, A. Blondeel, W. Janssens, and H. Demeyer, “The past, present and future of pulmonary rehabilitation,” RESPIROLOGY, vol. 24, no. 9, pp. 830–837, 2019.
@article{8658272,
  abstract     = {Abundant evidence supports the use of pulmonary rehabilitation as a treatment for stable and exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Several questions around the science base of rehabilitation in other patient groups as well as the role of rehabilitation as a component in other comprehensive care trajectories remain to be addressed. The impact of a rehabilitation programme could also perhaps be enhanced if clear guidance would be available on how to individualize the components of a rehabilitation programme in individual patients. The rehabilitation community, in an attempt to increase access to programmes, has developed less rigorous interventions. These may serve specific patients (e.g. less severe patients or may be used as a maintenance programme), but in order to have conceptual clarity they should not be called substitutes for rehabilitation if they do not meet the definition of rehabilitation. Reaching clarity on the best format for maintenance programmes in order to achieve long-lasting health benefits for patients is another challenge. Furthermore, as many patients as possible should be referred to adequate rehabilitation programmes within their reach with fair reimbursement. Programmes should take into account the burden of the disease of a patient, the required components to tackle the problems, adequate assessment to document the outcome and the patient's preference. In summary, pulmonary rehabilitation is one of the most potent evidence-based therapies for patients with respiratory diseases. Researchers should continue to fine tune the interventions, get clarity on terminology as well as the ultimate outcomes for rehabilitation to ensure sustainable health effects.},
  author       = {Troosters, Thierry and Blondeel, Astrid and Janssens, Wim and Demeyer, Heleen},
  issn         = {1323-7799},
  journal      = {RESPIROLOGY},
  keywords     = {QUALITY-OF-LIFE,RESPIRATORY SOCIETY STATEMENT,HOME-BASED,TELEREHABILITATION,RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL,PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY,EXERCISE,COPD,DISEASE,COMMUNITY,IMPROVES,pulmonary rehabilitation,COPD,physical activity,exercise},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {830--837},
  title        = {The past, present and future of pulmonary rehabilitation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/resp.13517},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2019},
}

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