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Fecal non-aureus Staphylococci are a potential cause of bovine intramammary infection

Ameline Wuytack (UGent) , Anneleen De Visscher (UGent) , Sofie Piepers (UGent) , Freddy Haesebrouck (UGent) and Sarne De Vliegher (UGent)
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Abstract
The presence of non-aureus staphylococci (NAS) in bovine rectal feces has recently been described. Similar to other mastitis causing pathogens, shedding of NAS in the environment could result in intramammary infection. The objective of this study was to investigate whether NAS strains present in feces can cause intramammary infection, likely via teat apex colonization. During a cross-sectional study in 5 dairy herds, samples were collected from the habitats quarter milk, teat apices, and rectal feces from 25%, 10%, and 25% of the lactating cows, respectively, with a cow serving as the source of one type of sample only. Samples from clinical mastitis cases were continuously collected during the 1-year study period as well. The 6 most prevalent NAS species, Staphylococcus (S.) chromogenes, S. cohnii, S. devriesei, S. equorum, S. haemolyticus, and S. hominis, were further subtyped by random amplification of polymorphic deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR), when the same NAS species was present in the same herd in the three habitats. For S. chromogenes, S. cohnii, S. devriesei, and S. haemolyticus, the same RAPD type was found in rectal feces, teat apices, and quarter milk, indicating that fecal NAS can infect the mammary gland. For S. hominis and S. equorum, we were unable to confirm the presence of the same RAPD types in the three habitats.
Keywords
General Veterinary, COAGULASE-NEGATIVE STAPHYLOCOCCI, FIELD GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS, TEAT APEX COLONIZATION, SOMATIC-CELL COUNT, GENETIC DIVERSITY, TECHNICAL-NOTE, DAIRY HEIFERS, RISK-FACTORS, MILK, PREVALENCE

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Citation

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MLA
Wuytack, Ameline, et al. “Fecal Non-Aureus Staphylococci Are a Potential Cause of Bovine Intramammary Infection.” VETERINARY RESEARCH, vol. 51, no. 1, 2020, doi:10.1186/s13567-020-00761-5.
APA
Wuytack, A., De Visscher, A., Piepers, S., Haesebrouck, F., & De Vliegher, S. (2020). Fecal non-aureus Staphylococci are a potential cause of bovine intramammary infection. VETERINARY RESEARCH, 51(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13567-020-00761-5
Chicago author-date
Wuytack, Ameline, Anneleen De Visscher, Sofie Piepers, Freddy Haesebrouck, and Sarne De Vliegher. 2020. “Fecal Non-Aureus Staphylococci Are a Potential Cause of Bovine Intramammary Infection.” VETERINARY RESEARCH 51 (1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13567-020-00761-5.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Wuytack, Ameline, Anneleen De Visscher, Sofie Piepers, Freddy Haesebrouck, and Sarne De Vliegher. 2020. “Fecal Non-Aureus Staphylococci Are a Potential Cause of Bovine Intramammary Infection.” VETERINARY RESEARCH 51 (1). doi:10.1186/s13567-020-00761-5.
Vancouver
1.
Wuytack A, De Visscher A, Piepers S, Haesebrouck F, De Vliegher S. Fecal non-aureus Staphylococci are a potential cause of bovine intramammary infection. VETERINARY RESEARCH. 2020;51(1).
IEEE
[1]
A. Wuytack, A. De Visscher, S. Piepers, F. Haesebrouck, and S. De Vliegher, “Fecal non-aureus Staphylococci are a potential cause of bovine intramammary infection,” VETERINARY RESEARCH, vol. 51, no. 1, 2020.
@article{8656588,
  abstract     = {{The presence of non-aureus staphylococci (NAS) in bovine rectal feces has recently been described. Similar to other mastitis causing pathogens, shedding of NAS in the environment could result in intramammary infection. The objective of this study was to investigate whether NAS strains present in feces can cause intramammary infection, likely via teat apex colonization. During a cross-sectional study in 5 dairy herds, samples were collected from the habitats quarter milk, teat apices, and rectal feces from 25%, 10%, and 25% of the lactating cows, respectively, with a cow serving as the source of one type of sample only. Samples from clinical mastitis cases were continuously collected during the 1-year study period as well. The 6 most prevalent NAS species, Staphylococcus (S.) chromogenes, S. cohnii, S. devriesei, S. equorum, S. haemolyticus, and S. hominis, were further subtyped by random amplification of polymorphic deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR), when the same NAS species was present in the same herd in the three habitats. For S. chromogenes, S. cohnii, S. devriesei, and S. haemolyticus, the same RAPD type was found in rectal feces, teat apices, and quarter milk, indicating that fecal NAS can infect the mammary gland. For S. hominis and S. equorum, we were unable to confirm the presence of the same RAPD types in the three habitats.}},
  articleno    = {{32}},
  author       = {{Wuytack, Ameline and De Visscher, Anneleen and Piepers, Sofie and Haesebrouck, Freddy and De Vliegher, Sarne}},
  issn         = {{0928-4249}},
  journal      = {{VETERINARY RESEARCH}},
  keywords     = {{General Veterinary,COAGULASE-NEGATIVE STAPHYLOCOCCI,FIELD GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS,TEAT APEX COLONIZATION,SOMATIC-CELL COUNT,GENETIC DIVERSITY,TECHNICAL-NOTE,DAIRY HEIFERS,RISK-FACTORS,MILK,PREVALENCE}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{13}},
  title        = {{Fecal non-aureus Staphylococci are a potential cause of bovine intramammary infection}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13567-020-00761-5}},
  volume       = {{51}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}

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