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Human T cell glycosylation and implications on immune therapy for cancer

Elien De Bousser (UGent) , Leander Meuris (UGent) , Nico Callewaert (UGent) and Nele Festjens (UGent)
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Abstract
Glycosylation is an important post-translational modification, giving rise to a diverse and abundant repertoire of glycans on the cell surface, collectively known as the glycome. When focusing on immunity, glycans are indispensable in virtually all signaling and cell-cell interactions. More specifically, glycans have been shown to regulate key pathophysiological steps within T cell biology such as T cell development, thymocyte selection, T cell activity and signaling as well as T cell differentiation and proliferation. They are of major importance in determining the interaction of human T cells with tumor cells. In this review, we will describe the role of glycosylation of human T cells in more depth, elaborate on the importance of glycosylation in the interaction of human T cells with tumor cells and discuss the potential of cancer immunotherapies that are based on manipulating the glycome functions at the tumor immune interface.
Keywords
Immunology, Immunology and Allergy, Pharmacology

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MLA
De Bousser, Elien, et al. “Human T Cell Glycosylation and Implications on Immune Therapy for Cancer.” Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC, 2020.
APA
De Bousser, E., Meuris, L., Callewaert, N., & Festjens, N. (2020). Human T cell glycosylation and implications on immune therapy for cancer. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics.
Chicago author-date
De Bousser, Elien, Leander Meuris, Nico Callewaert, and Nele Festjens. 2020. “Human T Cell Glycosylation and Implications on Immune Therapy for Cancer.” Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Bousser, Elien, Leander Meuris, Nico Callewaert, and Nele Festjens. 2020. “Human T Cell Glycosylation and Implications on Immune Therapy for Cancer.” Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics.
Vancouver
1.
De Bousser E, Meuris L, Callewaert N, Festjens N. Human T cell glycosylation and implications on immune therapy for cancer. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics. 2020;
IEEE
[1]
E. De Bousser, L. Meuris, N. Callewaert, and N. Festjens, “Human T cell glycosylation and implications on immune therapy for cancer,” Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, 2020.
@article{8655234,
  abstract     = {Glycosylation is an important post-translational modification, giving rise to a diverse and abundant repertoire of glycans on the cell surface, collectively known as the glycome. When focusing on immunity, glycans are indispensable in virtually all signaling and cell-cell interactions. More specifically, glycans have been shown to regulate key pathophysiological steps within T cell biology such as T cell development, thymocyte selection, T cell activity and signaling as well as T cell differentiation and proliferation. They are of major importance in determining the interaction of human T cells with tumor cells. In this review, we will describe the role of glycosylation of human T cells in more depth, elaborate on the importance of glycosylation in the interaction of human T cells with tumor cells and discuss the potential of cancer immunotherapies that are based on manipulating the glycome functions at the tumor immune interface.},
  author       = {De Bousser, Elien and Meuris, Leander and Callewaert, Nico and Festjens, Nele},
  issn         = {2164-5515},
  journal      = {Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics},
  keywords     = {Immunology,Immunology and Allergy,Pharmacology},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {15},
  publisher    = {TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC},
  title        = {Human T cell glycosylation and implications on immune therapy for cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21645515.2020.1730658},
  year         = {2020},
}

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