Advanced search
2 files | 590.65 KB Add to list

Disliked but free to speak : cognitive ability is related to supporting freedom of speech for groups across the ideological spectrum

Jonas De keersmaecker (UGent) , Dries Bostyn (UGent) , Alain Van Hiel (UGent) and Arne Roets (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Freedom of speech for all citizens is often considered as a cornerstone of democratic societies. In three studies, we examined the relationship between cognitive ability and support for freedom of speech for a variety of social groups across the ideological spectrum (N (1) varies between 1,373 and 18,719, N (2) = 298, N (3) = 395). Corroborating our theoretical expectations, although cognitive ability was related to more affective prejudice toward relatively conservative groups and less affective prejudice toward relatively liberal groups (Study 2), people with higher levels of cognitive ability were more in favor of freedom of speech for all target groups (Studies 1-3). The relationship between cognitive ability and freedom of speech support was mediated by intellectual humility (preregistered Study 3). These results indicate that cognitive ability contributes to support for the democratic right of freedom of speech for all social-ideological groups.
Keywords
Clinical Psychology, Social Psychology, freedom of speech, cognitive ability, intellectual humility, prejudice, intergroup attitudes, INTELLECTUAL HUMILITY, INTELLIGENCE, ATTITUDES, PACKAGE

Downloads

  • De keersmaecker. SPPS 2019. Free speech. In press.pdf
    • full text (Accepted manuscript)
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 306.21 KB
  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 284.45 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
De keersmaecker, Jonas, et al. “Disliked but Free to Speak : Cognitive Ability Is Related to Supporting Freedom of Speech for Groups across the Ideological Spectrum.” SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PERSONALITY SCIENCE, 2020.
APA
De keersmaecker, J., Bostyn, D., Van Hiel, A., & Roets, A. (2020). Disliked but free to speak : cognitive ability is related to supporting freedom of speech for groups across the ideological spectrum. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PERSONALITY SCIENCE.
Chicago author-date
De keersmaecker, Jonas, Dries Bostyn, Alain Van Hiel, and Arne Roets. 2020. “Disliked but Free to Speak : Cognitive Ability Is Related to Supporting Freedom of Speech for Groups across the Ideological Spectrum.” SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PERSONALITY SCIENCE.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De keersmaecker, Jonas, Dries Bostyn, Alain Van Hiel, and Arne Roets. 2020. “Disliked but Free to Speak : Cognitive Ability Is Related to Supporting Freedom of Speech for Groups across the Ideological Spectrum.” SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PERSONALITY SCIENCE.
Vancouver
1.
De keersmaecker J, Bostyn D, Van Hiel A, Roets A. Disliked but free to speak : cognitive ability is related to supporting freedom of speech for groups across the ideological spectrum. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PERSONALITY SCIENCE. 2020;
IEEE
[1]
J. De keersmaecker, D. Bostyn, A. Van Hiel, and A. Roets, “Disliked but free to speak : cognitive ability is related to supporting freedom of speech for groups across the ideological spectrum,” SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PERSONALITY SCIENCE, 2020.
@article{8653562,
  abstract     = {Freedom of speech for all citizens is often considered as a cornerstone of democratic societies. In three studies, we examined the relationship between cognitive ability and support for freedom of speech for a variety of social groups across the ideological spectrum (N (1) varies between 1,373 and 18,719, N (2) = 298, N (3) = 395). Corroborating our theoretical expectations, although cognitive ability was related to more affective prejudice toward relatively conservative groups and less affective prejudice toward relatively liberal groups (Study 2), people with higher levels of cognitive ability were more in favor of freedom of speech for all target groups (Studies 1-3). The relationship between cognitive ability and freedom of speech support was mediated by intellectual humility (preregistered Study 3). These results indicate that cognitive ability contributes to support for the democratic right of freedom of speech for all social-ideological groups.},
  author       = {De keersmaecker, Jonas and Bostyn, Dries and Van Hiel, Alain and Roets, Arne},
  issn         = {1948-5506},
  journal      = {SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PERSONALITY SCIENCE},
  keywords     = {Clinical Psychology,Social Psychology,freedom of speech,cognitive ability,intellectual humility,prejudice,intergroup attitudes,INTELLECTUAL HUMILITY,INTELLIGENCE,ATTITUDES,PACKAGE},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {8},
  title        = {Disliked but free to speak : cognitive ability is related to supporting freedom of speech for groups across the ideological spectrum},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1948550619896168},
  year         = {2020},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: