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The Organizational Field of Blood Collection: A Multilevel Analysis of Organizational Determinants of Blood Donation in Europe

Sam Gorleer (UGent) , Piet Bracke (UGent) and Lesley Hustinx (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>Maintaining an adequate blood supply for transfusion poses a pressing challenge to society. We argue that this challenge has not been adequately addressed in previous research. Building upon Healy’s seminal work on ‘blood-collection regimes’ and the subsequent shift towards a field-level approach that broadens the analytical focus beyond the dyadic relationship between donors and organizations, we embed the act of blood donation within the organizational field in which blood establishments operate. We assume that varying modes of governance shape the organizational practices of donor recruitment and blood collection. Our analysis is based on Eurobarometer data from 2014 (number of countries = 28; number of individuals = 19,363). The results identify considerable variance in donation rates according to field characteristics in terms of hierarchical centralization and competitiveness. Decentralized systems without competition perform worst in terms of the recruitment of (first-time) blood donors. Competitive systems in which several different bodies share responsibility for the provision of blood to patients yield the highest donation rates.</jats:p>
Keywords
Sociology and Political Science

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MLA
Gorleer, Sam, et al. “The Organizational Field of Blood Collection: A Multilevel Analysis of Organizational Determinants of Blood Donation in Europe.” European Sociological Review, 2020.
APA
Gorleer, S., Bracke, P., & Hustinx, L. (2020). The Organizational Field of Blood Collection: A Multilevel Analysis of Organizational Determinants of Blood Donation in Europe. European Sociological Review.
Chicago author-date
Gorleer, Sam, Piet Bracke, and Lesley Hustinx. 2020. “The Organizational Field of Blood Collection: A Multilevel Analysis of Organizational Determinants of Blood Donation in Europe.” European Sociological Review.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Gorleer, Sam, Piet Bracke, and Lesley Hustinx. 2020. “The Organizational Field of Blood Collection: A Multilevel Analysis of Organizational Determinants of Blood Donation in Europe.” European Sociological Review.
Vancouver
1.
Gorleer S, Bracke P, Hustinx L. The Organizational Field of Blood Collection: A Multilevel Analysis of Organizational Determinants of Blood Donation in Europe. European Sociological Review. 2020;
IEEE
[1]
S. Gorleer, P. Bracke, and L. Hustinx, “The Organizational Field of Blood Collection: A Multilevel Analysis of Organizational Determinants of Blood Donation in Europe,” European Sociological Review, 2020.
@article{8653482,
  abstract     = {<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title>
               <jats:p>Maintaining an adequate blood supply for transfusion poses a pressing challenge to society. We argue that this challenge has not been adequately addressed in previous research. Building upon Healy’s seminal work on ‘blood-collection regimes’ and the subsequent shift towards a field-level approach that broadens the analytical focus beyond the dyadic relationship between donors and organizations, we embed the act of blood donation within the organizational field in which blood establishments operate. We assume that varying modes of governance shape the organizational practices of donor recruitment and blood collection. Our analysis is based on Eurobarometer data from 2014 (number of countries = 28; number of individuals = 19,363). The results identify considerable variance in donation rates according to field characteristics in terms of hierarchical centralization and competitiveness. Decentralized systems without competition perform worst in terms of the recruitment of (first-time) blood donors. Competitive systems in which several different bodies share responsibility for the provision of blood to patients yield the highest donation rates.</jats:p>},
  author       = {Gorleer, Sam and Bracke, Piet and Hustinx, Lesley},
  issn         = {0266-7215},
  journal      = {European Sociological Review},
  keywords     = {Sociology and Political Science},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {The Organizational Field of Blood Collection: A Multilevel Analysis of Organizational Determinants of Blood Donation in Europe},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/esr/jcaa002},
  year         = {2020},
}

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