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The ecological signal on the shape of the lacertid vestibular system : simple versus complex microhabitats

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Abstract
Shape variation in the vestibular system is often linked to microhabitat structure and locomotor performance. Highly circular and orthogonal semicircular canal pairs are linked to higher motion sensitivity. Here, we use 3D geometric morphometrics to investigate shape variation in the vestibular system within lacertid lizards and its relationship to balance control. We found that lacertids living in complex microhabitats possess narrow but longer vestibular systems, an S-shaped anterior canal, a straightened lateral canal and a short common crus. However, lacertids specialized for simple microhabitats (open areas) possess wider but shorter vestibular systems, more circular anterior and lateral canals, and a longer common crus. Contrary to our expectations, species living in simple microhabitats possess more anatomical adaptations that enhance the sensitivity of their vestibular system. This suggests that species inhabiting open areas may benefit from increased sensitivity given that they are potentially more visibile to predators and have lower shelter availability. Finally, the wider shape of the vestibular system of the open area species may be linked to a wider and potentially flattened skull, which may be related to sand-diving or prey hardness.
Keywords
balance, biomechanics, bony labyrinth, geometric morphometrics, lizards, locomotion, semicircular canals, SEMICIRCULAR CANAL MORPHOLOGY, BONY LABYRINTH, INTRASPECIFIC VARIATION, MULTIMODAL INTEGRATION, PHYLOGENETIC SIGNAL, SELF-MOTION, HABITAT USE, INNER-EAR, EVOLUTION, SIZE

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Citation

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MLA
Vasilopoulou-Kampitsi, M., et al. “The Ecological Signal on the Shape of the Lacertid Vestibular System : Simple versus Complex Microhabitats.” BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY, vol. 127, no. 2, 2019, pp. 260–77.
APA
Vasilopoulou-Kampitsi, M., Goyens, J., Van Damme, R., & Aerts, P. (2019). The ecological signal on the shape of the lacertid vestibular system : simple versus complex microhabitats. BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY, 127(2), 260–277.
Chicago author-date
Vasilopoulou-Kampitsi, M, J Goyens, R Van Damme, and Peter Aerts. 2019. “The Ecological Signal on the Shape of the Lacertid Vestibular System : Simple versus Complex Microhabitats.” BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY 127 (2): 260–77.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vasilopoulou-Kampitsi, M, J Goyens, R Van Damme, and Peter Aerts. 2019. “The Ecological Signal on the Shape of the Lacertid Vestibular System : Simple versus Complex Microhabitats.” BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY 127 (2): 260–277.
Vancouver
1.
Vasilopoulou-Kampitsi M, Goyens J, Van Damme R, Aerts P. The ecological signal on the shape of the lacertid vestibular system : simple versus complex microhabitats. BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY. 2019;127(2):260–77.
IEEE
[1]
M. Vasilopoulou-Kampitsi, J. Goyens, R. Van Damme, and P. Aerts, “The ecological signal on the shape of the lacertid vestibular system : simple versus complex microhabitats,” BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY, vol. 127, no. 2, pp. 260–277, 2019.
@article{8649742,
  abstract     = {Shape variation in the vestibular system is often linked to microhabitat structure and locomotor performance. Highly circular and orthogonal semicircular canal pairs are linked to higher motion sensitivity. Here, we use 3D geometric morphometrics to investigate shape variation in the vestibular system within lacertid lizards and its relationship to balance control. We found that lacertids living in complex microhabitats possess narrow but longer vestibular systems, an S-shaped anterior canal, a straightened lateral canal and a short common crus. However, lacertids specialized for simple microhabitats (open areas) possess wider but shorter vestibular systems, more circular anterior and lateral canals, and a longer common crus. Contrary to our expectations, species living in simple microhabitats possess more anatomical adaptations that enhance the sensitivity of their vestibular system. This suggests that species inhabiting open areas may benefit from increased sensitivity given that they are potentially more visibile to predators and have lower shelter availability. Finally, the wider shape of the vestibular system of the open area species may be linked to a wider and potentially flattened skull, which may be related to sand-diving or prey hardness.},
  author       = {Vasilopoulou-Kampitsi, M and Goyens, J and Van Damme, R and Aerts, Peter},
  issn         = {0024-4066},
  journal      = {BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY},
  keywords     = {balance,biomechanics,bony labyrinth,geometric morphometrics,lizards,locomotion,semicircular canals,SEMICIRCULAR CANAL MORPHOLOGY,BONY LABYRINTH,INTRASPECIFIC VARIATION,MULTIMODAL INTEGRATION,PHYLOGENETIC SIGNAL,SELF-MOTION,HABITAT USE,INNER-EAR,EVOLUTION,SIZE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {260--277},
  title        = {The ecological signal on the shape of the lacertid vestibular system : simple versus complex microhabitats},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biolinnean/blz022},
  volume       = {127},
  year         = {2019},
}

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