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How do trees respond to species mixing in experimental compared to observational studies?

(2019) ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION. 9(19). p.11254-11265
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Abstract
For decades, ecologists have investigated the effects of tree species diversity on tree productivity at different scales and with different approaches ranging from observational to experimental study designs. Using data from five European national forest inventories (16,773 plots), six tree species diversity experiments (584 plots), and six networks of comparative plots (169 plots), we tested whether tree species growth responses to species mixing are consistent and therefore transferrable between those different research approaches. Our results confirm the general positive effect of tree species mixing on species growth (16% on average) but we found no consistency in species-specific responses to mixing between any of the three approaches, even after restricting comparisons to only those plots that shared similar mixtures compositions and forest types. These findings highlight the necessity to consider results from different research approaches when selecting species mixtures that should maximize positive forest biodiversity and functioning relationships.
Keywords
Ecology, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, Nature and Landscape Conservation, biodiversity, ecosystem function and services, FunDivEUROPE, national forest inventories, productivity, species richness, synthesis, tree growth, TreeDivNet, DIVERSITY-PRODUCTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS, FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY, BIODIVERSITY LOSS, ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION, WOOD PRODUCTION, INCREASES, RICHNESS, PATTERNS, GROWTH, COMPETITION

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Citation

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MLA
Kambach, Stephan, et al. “How Do Trees Respond to Species Mixing in Experimental Compared to Observational Studies?” ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, vol. 9, no. 19, 2019, pp. 11254–65.
APA
Kambach, S., Allan, E., Bilodeau‐Gauthier, S., Coomes, D. A., Haase, J., Jucker, T., … Bruelheide, H. (2019). How do trees respond to species mixing in experimental compared to observational studies? ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, 9(19), 11254–11265.
Chicago author-date
Kambach, Stephan, Eric Allan, Simon Bilodeau‐Gauthier, David A. Coomes, Josephine Haase, Tommaso Jucker, Georges Kunstler, et al. 2019. “How Do Trees Respond to Species Mixing in Experimental Compared to Observational Studies?” ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION 9 (19): 11254–65.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Kambach, Stephan, Eric Allan, Simon Bilodeau‐Gauthier, David A. Coomes, Josephine Haase, Tommaso Jucker, Georges Kunstler, Sandra Müller, Charles Nock, Alain Paquette, Fons Van der Plas, Sophia Ratcliffe, Fabian Roger, Paloma Ruiz‐Benito, Michael Scherer‐Lorenzen, Harald Auge, Olivier Bouriaud, Bastien Castagneyrol, Jonas Dahlgren, Lars Gamfeldt, Hervé Jactel, Gerald Kändler, Julia Koricheva, Aleksi Lehtonen, Bart Muys, Quentin Ponette, Nuri Nurlaila Setiawan, Thomas Van de Peer, Kris Verheyen, Miguel A. Zavala, and Helge Bruelheide. 2019. “How Do Trees Respond to Species Mixing in Experimental Compared to Observational Studies?” ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION 9 (19): 11254–11265.
Vancouver
1.
Kambach S, Allan E, Bilodeau‐Gauthier S, Coomes DA, Haase J, Jucker T, et al. How do trees respond to species mixing in experimental compared to observational studies? ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION. 2019;9(19):11254–65.
IEEE
[1]
S. Kambach et al., “How do trees respond to species mixing in experimental compared to observational studies?,” ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, vol. 9, no. 19, pp. 11254–11265, 2019.
@article{8649727,
  abstract     = {For decades, ecologists have investigated the effects of tree species diversity on tree productivity at different scales and with different approaches ranging from observational to experimental study designs. Using data from five European national forest inventories (16,773 plots), six tree species diversity experiments (584 plots), and six networks of comparative plots (169 plots), we tested whether tree species growth responses to species mixing are consistent and therefore transferrable between those different research approaches. Our results confirm the general positive effect of tree species mixing on species growth (16% on average) but we found no consistency in species-specific responses to mixing between any of the three approaches, even after restricting comparisons to only those plots that shared similar mixtures compositions and forest types. These findings highlight the necessity to consider results from different research approaches when selecting species mixtures that should maximize positive forest biodiversity and functioning relationships.},
  author       = {Kambach, Stephan and Allan, Eric and Bilodeau‐Gauthier, Simon and Coomes, David A. and Haase, Josephine and Jucker, Tommaso and Kunstler, Georges and Müller, Sandra and Nock, Charles and Paquette, Alain and Van der Plas, Fons and Ratcliffe, Sophia and Roger, Fabian and Ruiz‐Benito, Paloma and Scherer‐Lorenzen, Michael and Auge, Harald and Bouriaud, Olivier and Castagneyrol, Bastien and Dahlgren, Jonas and Gamfeldt, Lars and Jactel, Hervé and Kändler, Gerald and Koricheva, Julia and Lehtonen, Aleksi and Muys, Bart and Ponette, Quentin and Setiawan, Nuri Nurlaila and Van de Peer, Thomas and Verheyen, Kris and Zavala, Miguel A. and Bruelheide, Helge},
  issn         = {2045-7758},
  journal      = {ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION},
  keywords     = {Ecology,Ecology,Evolution,Behavior and Systematics,Nature and Landscape Conservation,biodiversity,ecosystem function and services,FunDivEUROPE,national forest inventories,productivity,species richness,synthesis,tree growth,TreeDivNet,DIVERSITY-PRODUCTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS,FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY,BIODIVERSITY LOSS,ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION,WOOD PRODUCTION,INCREASES,RICHNESS,PATTERNS,GROWTH,COMPETITION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {19},
  pages        = {11254--11265},
  title        = {How do trees respond to species mixing in experimental compared to observational studies?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.5627},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2019},
}

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