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Artistic patronage in Bruges institutions, ca. 1440-1482

(1992)
Author
Promoter
Burr Warren and Alfred Moir
Organization
Abstract
Between 1440 and the early 1480s, Bruges experienced a stable political and economic climate, which created favorable conditions for artistic patronage. As a favorite ducal residence where many important events were held, and an international center of commerce, Bruges counted many potential patrons of art amongst its residents. This attracted first-rate artists from all over the Burgundian lands. The Burgundian dukes stimulated artistic production by commissioning works of art, such as illuminated manuscripts and decorations for festivities. The City magistrature and the Franc employed artists chiefly for decorative tasks. They often expressed their political aspirations through artistic means, as is seen in the decorations for triumphal entries of the duke. Artistic patronage in churches derived from three different sources: the church itself, individuals and foundations of social groups. The social prestige of a church determined the artistic patronage it enjoyed. The churches employed artists for various decorative and maintenance tasks. Guilds and confraternities endowed chapels and held religious services at the altars of Bruges churches, which they furnished with all sorts of precious sacerdotal garb, ritual ornaments, liturgical manuscripts, and sometimes altarpieces, stained glass windows and sculptures. vii Some wealthy citizens, who usually belonged to the city's upper class, financed the foundation of such chapels with their own private funds. Often these chapels also had a funerary function. The cloister churches of the mendicant orders attracted the patronage of the foreign merchants. Some abbots and priors had a prominent influence on the cultural life in the abbeys or cloisters they headed. Patronage in hospitals issued mainly from affluent members of the community that served the institution, and sometimes from pensioners: senior laymen who rented lodging in the institution. Major works of art seem to have originated when diverse considerations -- and not only devotional ones-- coincided and made the expenditure an attractive investment. The easy identification of the patron of a certain object was certified by the application of such personal marks as his coat of arms or devices. The patron often attempted to guarantee the survival of his foundation and secure its administration by appointing a guild as trustee of the foundation.

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Citation

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MLA
Martens, Maximiliaan. Artistic Patronage in Bruges Institutions, ca. 1440-1482. University of California, 1992.
APA
Martens, M. (1992). Artistic patronage in Bruges institutions, ca. 1440-1482. University of California, Santa Barbara.
Chicago author-date
Martens, Maximiliaan. 1992. “Artistic Patronage in Bruges Institutions, ca. 1440-1482.” Santa Barbara: University of California.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Martens, Maximiliaan. 1992. “Artistic Patronage in Bruges Institutions, ca. 1440-1482.” Santa Barbara: University of California.
Vancouver
1.
Martens M. Artistic patronage in Bruges institutions, ca. 1440-1482. [Santa Barbara]: University of California; 1992.
IEEE
[1]
M. Martens, “Artistic patronage in Bruges institutions, ca. 1440-1482,” University of California, Santa Barbara, 1992.
@phdthesis{8647376,
  abstract     = {Between 1440 and the early 1480s, Bruges experienced a stable political
and economic climate, which created favorable conditions for artistic patronage.
As a favorite ducal residence where many important events were held, and
an international center of commerce, Bruges counted many potential patrons of art
amongst its residents. This attracted first-rate artists from all over the Burgundian
lands.
The Burgundian dukes stimulated artistic production by commissioning
works of art, such as illuminated manuscripts and decorations for festivities.
The City magistrature and the Franc employed artists chiefly for decorative
tasks. They often expressed their political aspirations through artistic means, as is
seen in the decorations for triumphal entries of the duke.
Artistic patronage in churches derived from three different sources: the
church itself, individuals and foundations of social groups. The social prestige of
a church determined the artistic patronage it enjoyed. The churches employed
artists for various decorative and maintenance tasks. Guilds and confraternities
endowed chapels and held religious services at the altars of Bruges churches, which
they furnished with all sorts of precious sacerdotal garb, ritual ornaments, liturgical
manuscripts, and sometimes altarpieces, stained glass windows and sculptures.
vii
Some wealthy citizens, who usually belonged to the city's upper class, financed the
foundation of such chapels with their own private funds. Often these chapels also
had a funerary function.
The cloister churches of the mendicant orders attracted the patronage of the
foreign merchants. Some abbots and priors had a prominent influence on the
cultural life in the abbeys or cloisters they headed.
Patronage in hospitals issued mainly from affluent members of the
community that served the institution, and sometimes from pensioners: senior
laymen who rented lodging in the institution.
Major works of art seem to have originated when diverse considerations --
and not only devotional ones-- coincided and made the expenditure an attractive
investment. The easy identification of the patron of a certain object was certified
by the application of such personal marks as his coat of arms or devices. The patron
often attempted to guarantee the survival of his foundation and secure its
administration by appointing a guild as trustee of the foundation.},
  author       = {Martens, Maximiliaan},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {720},
  publisher    = {University of California},
  title        = {Artistic patronage in Bruges institutions, ca. 1440-1482},
  year         = {1992},
}