Advanced search
1 file | 2.83 MB Add to list

Integration of nematology as a training and research discipline in sub-Saharan Africa : progress and prospects

Laura Cortada-Gonzalez (UGent) , Inge Dehennin (UGent) , Wim Bert (UGent) and Danny Coyne
(2019) NEMATOLOGY. 22(1). p.1-21
Author
Organization
Abstract
Within sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), although nematodes are viewed among the most important threats to crop production and food security, the presence of trained nematologists working within this discipline has traditionally been viewed as scarce. The few research studies concerning this subject address this topic from a country or sub-regional perspective and generally portray nematology as 'insufficient'. Over the past two decades, a few initiatives have been instrumental in building greater nematology expertise. For the first time a structured survey was undertaken, involving interviews with individuals from SSA that were (or currently are) involved in nematology training programmes, research, national extension services or in African universities. This paper provides evidence of the positive impact of various initiatives and shows an increase in the number of available nematology positions, together with high rates of graduates that return home to occupy qualified positions. Our findings will help researchers. policy makers and donors to identify areas requiring support to increase the promotion of nematology in SSA and to make an impact for end-users.
Keywords
Agronomy and Crop Science, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, academic curricula, capacity building, education, EUMAINE, extension services, IMaNema, PINC, tertiary institutions, universities, SMALLHOLDER FARMERS, BRAIN-DRAIN, NEMATODES, ACCESS, CHALLENGES, ETHIOPIA, EAST

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 2.83 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Cortada-Gonzalez, Laura, et al. “Integration of Nematology as a Training and Research Discipline in Sub-Saharan Africa : Progress and Prospects.” NEMATOLOGY, vol. 22, no. 1, 2019, pp. 1–21.
APA
Cortada-Gonzalez, L., Dehennin, I., Bert, W., & Coyne, D. (2019). Integration of nematology as a training and research discipline in sub-Saharan Africa : progress and prospects. NEMATOLOGY, 22(1), 1–21.
Chicago author-date
Cortada-Gonzalez, Laura, Inge Dehennin, Wim Bert, and Danny Coyne. 2019. “Integration of Nematology as a Training and Research Discipline in Sub-Saharan Africa : Progress and Prospects.” NEMATOLOGY 22 (1): 1–21.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Cortada-Gonzalez, Laura, Inge Dehennin, Wim Bert, and Danny Coyne. 2019. “Integration of Nematology as a Training and Research Discipline in Sub-Saharan Africa : Progress and Prospects.” NEMATOLOGY 22 (1): 1–21.
Vancouver
1.
Cortada-Gonzalez L, Dehennin I, Bert W, Coyne D. Integration of nematology as a training and research discipline in sub-Saharan Africa : progress and prospects. NEMATOLOGY. 2019;22(1):1–21.
IEEE
[1]
L. Cortada-Gonzalez, I. Dehennin, W. Bert, and D. Coyne, “Integration of nematology as a training and research discipline in sub-Saharan Africa : progress and prospects,” NEMATOLOGY, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 1–21, 2019.
@article{8644435,
  abstract     = {{Within sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), although nematodes are viewed among the most important threats to crop production and food security, the presence of trained nematologists working within this discipline has traditionally been viewed as scarce. The few research studies concerning this subject address this topic from a country or sub-regional perspective and generally portray nematology as 'insufficient'. Over the past two decades, a few initiatives have been instrumental in building greater nematology expertise. For the first time a structured survey was undertaken, involving interviews with individuals from SSA that were (or currently are) involved in nematology training programmes, research, national extension services or in African universities. This paper provides evidence of the positive impact of various initiatives and shows an increase in the number of available nematology positions, together with high rates of graduates that return home to occupy qualified positions. Our findings will help researchers. policy makers and donors to identify areas requiring support to increase the promotion of nematology in SSA and to make an impact for end-users.}},
  author       = {{Cortada-Gonzalez, Laura and Dehennin, Inge and Bert, Wim and Coyne, Danny}},
  issn         = {{1388-5545}},
  journal      = {{NEMATOLOGY}},
  keywords     = {{Agronomy and Crop Science,Ecology,Evolution,Behavior and Systematics,academic curricula,capacity building,education,EUMAINE,extension services,IMaNema,PINC,tertiary institutions,universities,SMALLHOLDER FARMERS,BRAIN-DRAIN,NEMATODES,ACCESS,CHALLENGES,ETHIOPIA,EAST}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{1--21}},
  title        = {{Integration of nematology as a training and research discipline in sub-Saharan Africa : progress and prospects}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685411-00003291}},
  volume       = {{22}},
  year         = {{2019}},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: