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The role of competence‑related attentional bias and resilience in restoring thwarted feelings of competence

(2020) MOTIVATION AND EMOTION. 44(1). p.82-98
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Abstract
The key goal of the present study was to examine how people deal with feelings of failure stemming from negative feedback. Specifically, we investigated whether individuals, and in particular those high in resilience, would display an attentional bias for competence-related cues after receiving competence-thwarting (i.e., negative) feedback. First, we validated a dot probe task tapping into competence-related attentional bias in a pilot study with 80 participants (Mage = 19.06, SDage = 3.91; 84% female). Subsequently, in the main study, another group of 60 participants (Mage = 21.95, SDage = 3.00; 68% female) were randomly provided with either positive or negative feedback after participating in a puzzle task. Subsequently, participants’ puzzle-task competence and their attentional bias were assessed, while their behavioral persistence during a free-choice period was recorded. First, results showed that participants in the negative, relative to the positive, feedback condition experienced higher levels of puzzle-task related competence frustration and displayed a stronger attentional bias for competence-related words. Next, regression analyses revealed that only individuals high in resilience displayed an attentional bias towards competence-related words in response to negative feedback. Finally, we found that such attentional bias was functional for a recovery in feelings of competence over time among those who received negative feedback. The discussion focuses on the role of attentional bias as a potential need-restoring coping mechanism.
Keywords
Resilience, Attentional bias, Need frustration, Negative feedback, Self-determination theory, CONNOR-DAVIDSON RESILIENCE, SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY, INTRINSIC MOTIVATION, EXPERIMENTAL MANIPULATION, SELECTIVE ATTENTION, FEEDBACK, AUTONOMY, REWARDS, ANXIETY, NEED

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MLA
Waterschoot, Joachim, et al. “The Role of Competence‑related Attentional Bias and Resilience in Restoring Thwarted Feelings of Competence.” MOTIVATION AND EMOTION, vol. 44, no. 1, 2020, pp. 82–98.
APA
Waterschoot, J., Van der Kaap-Deeder, J., & Vansteenkiste, M. (2020). The role of competence‑related attentional bias and resilience in restoring thwarted feelings of competence. MOTIVATION AND EMOTION, 44(1), 82–98.
Chicago author-date
Waterschoot, Joachim, Jolene Van der Kaap-Deeder, and Maarten Vansteenkiste. 2020. “The Role of Competence‑related Attentional Bias and Resilience in Restoring Thwarted Feelings of Competence.” MOTIVATION AND EMOTION 44 (1): 82–98.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Waterschoot, Joachim, Jolene Van der Kaap-Deeder, and Maarten Vansteenkiste. 2020. “The Role of Competence‑related Attentional Bias and Resilience in Restoring Thwarted Feelings of Competence.” MOTIVATION AND EMOTION 44 (1): 82–98.
Vancouver
1.
Waterschoot J, Van der Kaap-Deeder J, Vansteenkiste M. The role of competence‑related attentional bias and resilience in restoring thwarted feelings of competence. MOTIVATION AND EMOTION. 2020;44(1):82–98.
IEEE
[1]
J. Waterschoot, J. Van der Kaap-Deeder, and M. Vansteenkiste, “The role of competence‑related attentional bias and resilience in restoring thwarted feelings of competence,” MOTIVATION AND EMOTION, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 82–98, 2020.
@article{8644020,
  abstract     = {The key goal of the present study was to examine how people deal with feelings of failure stemming from negative feedback. Specifically, we investigated whether individuals, and in particular those high in resilience, would display an attentional bias for competence-related cues after receiving competence-thwarting (i.e., negative) feedback. First, we validated a dot probe task tapping into competence-related attentional bias in a pilot study with 80 participants (Mage = 19.06, SDage = 3.91; 84% female). Subsequently, in the main study, another group of 60 participants (Mage = 21.95, SDage = 3.00; 68% female) were randomly provided with either positive or negative feedback after participating in a puzzle task. Subsequently, participants’ puzzle-task competence and their attentional bias were assessed, while their behavioral persistence during a free-choice period was recorded. First, results showed that participants in the negative, relative to the positive, feedback condition experienced higher levels of puzzle-task related competence frustration and displayed a stronger attentional bias for competence-related words. Next, regression analyses revealed that only individuals high in resilience displayed an attentional bias towards competence-related words in response to negative feedback. Finally, we found that such attentional bias was functional for a recovery in feelings of competence over time among those who received negative feedback. The discussion focuses on the role of attentional bias as a potential need-restoring coping mechanism.},
  author       = {Waterschoot, Joachim and Van der Kaap-Deeder, Jolene and Vansteenkiste, Maarten},
  issn         = {0146-7239},
  journal      = {MOTIVATION AND EMOTION},
  keywords     = {Resilience,Attentional bias,Need frustration,Negative feedback,Self-determination theory,CONNOR-DAVIDSON RESILIENCE,SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY,INTRINSIC MOTIVATION,EXPERIMENTAL MANIPULATION,SELECTIVE ATTENTION,FEEDBACK,AUTONOMY,REWARDS,ANXIETY,NEED},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {82--98},
  title        = {The role of competence‑related attentional bias and resilience in restoring thwarted feelings of competence},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11031-019-09776-8},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2020},
}

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