Advanced search
1 file | 1.68 MB Add to list

The role of bite force in the evolution of head shape and head shape dimorphism in Anolis lizards

(2019) FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY. 33(11). p.2191-2202
Author
Organization
Abstract
Patterns of convergent evolution in head shape, combined with performance measures, provide ideal opportunities to understand the processes driving its evolution. Anole lizards represent an excellent subject to test this, as recurrent habitat specialists or ecomorphs evolved independently across different islands. We show that phenotypic similarity corresponds to both phylogenetic similarity and similarity in habitat, indicating that there is convergent evolution in head shape among ecomorphs. Moreover, we show that the evolution of tall, wide heads correlate with the evolution of higher bite forces, driving head shape variation among and within ecomorphs. In addition, the processes affecting head shape variation can differ between sexes, leading to sexual head shape dimorphism. These processes might, however, still depend on the habitat. Consequently, there could also be convergent evolution in head shape dimorphism among ecomorphs. We found no evidence for convergent evolution in sexual head shape dimorphism. Moreover, the sexual head shape dimorphism correlates poorly with bite force, suggesting that intersexual head shape differences are related to other functions. Different processes are thus driving the evolution of head shape and head shape dimorphism. A free Plain Language Summary can be found within the Supporting Information of this article.
Keywords
bite force, convergent evolution, ecomorph, head shape, phylogenetic signal, sexual dimorphism, CONVERGENT EVOLUTION, SEXUAL-DIMORPHISM, HABITAT USE, ADAPTIVE RADIATION, PERFORMANCE, SIZE, MORPHOLOGY, CONSEQUENCES, PHYLOGENIES, CAPACITY

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.68 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
De Meyer, Jens, et al. “The Role of Bite Force in the Evolution of Head Shape and Head Shape Dimorphism in Anolis Lizards.” FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY, vol. 33, no. 11, 2019, pp. 2191–202, doi:10.1111/1365-2435.13438.
APA
De Meyer, J., Irschick, D. J., Vanhooydonck, B., Losos, J. B., Adriaens, D., & Herrel, A. (2019). The role of bite force in the evolution of head shape and head shape dimorphism in Anolis lizards. FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY, 33(11), 2191–2202. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.13438
Chicago author-date
De Meyer, Jens, Duncan J Irschick, Bieke Vanhooydonck, Jonathan B Losos, Dominique Adriaens, and Anthony Herrel. 2019. “The Role of Bite Force in the Evolution of Head Shape and Head Shape Dimorphism in Anolis Lizards.” FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY 33 (11): 2191–2202. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.13438.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Meyer, Jens, Duncan J Irschick, Bieke Vanhooydonck, Jonathan B Losos, Dominique Adriaens, and Anthony Herrel. 2019. “The Role of Bite Force in the Evolution of Head Shape and Head Shape Dimorphism in Anolis Lizards.” FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY 33 (11): 2191–2202. doi:10.1111/1365-2435.13438.
Vancouver
1.
De Meyer J, Irschick DJ, Vanhooydonck B, Losos JB, Adriaens D, Herrel A. The role of bite force in the evolution of head shape and head shape dimorphism in Anolis lizards. FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY. 2019;33(11):2191–202.
IEEE
[1]
J. De Meyer, D. J. Irschick, B. Vanhooydonck, J. B. Losos, D. Adriaens, and A. Herrel, “The role of bite force in the evolution of head shape and head shape dimorphism in Anolis lizards,” FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY, vol. 33, no. 11, pp. 2191–2202, 2019.
@article{8642520,
  abstract     = {Patterns of convergent evolution in head shape, combined with performance measures, provide ideal opportunities to understand the processes driving its evolution. Anole lizards represent an excellent subject to test this, as recurrent habitat specialists or ecomorphs evolved independently across different islands. We show that phenotypic similarity corresponds to both phylogenetic similarity and similarity in habitat, indicating that there is convergent evolution in head shape among ecomorphs. Moreover, we show that the evolution of tall, wide heads correlate with the evolution of higher bite forces, driving head shape variation among and within ecomorphs. In addition, the processes affecting head shape variation can differ between sexes, leading to sexual head shape dimorphism. These processes might, however, still depend on the habitat. Consequently, there could also be convergent evolution in head shape dimorphism among ecomorphs. We found no evidence for convergent evolution in sexual head shape dimorphism. Moreover, the sexual head shape dimorphism correlates poorly with bite force, suggesting that intersexual head shape differences are related to other functions. Different processes are thus driving the evolution of head shape and head shape dimorphism. A free Plain Language Summary can be found within the Supporting Information of this article.},
  author       = {De Meyer, Jens and Irschick, Duncan J and Vanhooydonck, Bieke and Losos, Jonathan B and Adriaens, Dominique and Herrel, Anthony},
  issn         = {0269-8463},
  journal      = {FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY},
  keywords     = {bite force,convergent evolution,ecomorph,head shape,phylogenetic signal,sexual dimorphism,CONVERGENT EVOLUTION,SEXUAL-DIMORPHISM,HABITAT USE,ADAPTIVE RADIATION,PERFORMANCE,SIZE,MORPHOLOGY,CONSEQUENCES,PHYLOGENIES,CAPACITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2191--2202},
  title        = {The role of bite force in the evolution of head shape and head shape dimorphism in Anolis lizards},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.13438},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2019},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: