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Host specificity in diatom-bacteria interactions alleviates antagonistic effects

Willem Stock (UGent) , Lander Blommaert (UGent) , Marleen De Troch (UGent) , Sven Mangelinckx (UGent) , Anne Willems (UGent) , Wim Vyverman (UGent) and Koen Sabbe (UGent)
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Abstract
While different microalgae tend to be associated with different bacteria, it remains unclear whether such specific associations are beneficial for the microalgae. We assessed the impact of bacterial isolates, derived from various marine benthic diatoms, on the growth of several strains belonging to the Cylindrotheca closterium diatom species complex. We first tested the effect of 35 different bacterial isolates on the growth of a single C. closterium strain, and then evaluated the impact of 8 of these isolates on the growth of 6 C. closterium strains and 1 Cylindrotheca fusiformis strain. Surprisingly, most interactions were neutral to antagonistic. The interactions were highly specific, with diatom growth in the presence of specific bacteria differing between Cylindrotheca strains and species, and closely related bacteria eliciting contrasting diatom growth responses. These differences could be related to the origin of the bacterial isolates, as only isolates from foreign diatom hosts significantly reduced diatom growth, implying coadaptation between different Cylindrotheca strains and their associated bacteria. Interestingly, the antagonistic effect of a Marinobacter strain was alleviated by the presence of a microbial inoculum that was native to the diatom host, suggesting that coadapted bacteria might also benefit their host indirectly by preventing the establishment of harmful bacteria.
Keywords
Cylindrotheca, microbial interactions, bacteria-diatom cocultures, coadaptation, microbiome, algal-bacterial interactions, MARINOBACTER-ADHAERENS, PHYLOGENETIC SIGNAL, THALASSIOSIRA-WEISSFLOGII, MICROBIAL INTERACTIONS, ORGANIC-COMPOUNDS, PSEUDO-NITZSCHIA, BENTHIC DIATOMS, MARINE DIATOM, PHYTOPLANKTON, GROWTH

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MLA
Stock, Willem, et al. “Host Specificity in Diatom-Bacteria Interactions Alleviates Antagonistic Effects.” FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY, vol. 95, no. 11, 2019.
APA
Stock, W., Blommaert, L., De Troch, M., Mangelinckx, S., Willems, A., Vyverman, W., & Sabbe, K. (2019). Host specificity in diatom-bacteria interactions alleviates antagonistic effects. FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY, 95(11).
Chicago author-date
Stock, Willem, Lander Blommaert, Marleen De Troch, Sven Mangelinckx, Anne Willems, Wim Vyverman, and Koen Sabbe. 2019. “Host Specificity in Diatom-Bacteria Interactions Alleviates Antagonistic Effects.” FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY 95 (11).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Stock, Willem, Lander Blommaert, Marleen De Troch, Sven Mangelinckx, Anne Willems, Wim Vyverman, and Koen Sabbe. 2019. “Host Specificity in Diatom-Bacteria Interactions Alleviates Antagonistic Effects.” FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY 95 (11).
Vancouver
1.
Stock W, Blommaert L, De Troch M, Mangelinckx S, Willems A, Vyverman W, et al. Host specificity in diatom-bacteria interactions alleviates antagonistic effects. FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY. 2019;95(11).
IEEE
[1]
W. Stock et al., “Host specificity in diatom-bacteria interactions alleviates antagonistic effects,” FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY, vol. 95, no. 11, 2019.
@article{8642395,
  abstract     = {{While different microalgae tend to be associated with different bacteria, it remains unclear whether such specific associations are beneficial for the microalgae. We assessed the impact of bacterial isolates, derived from various marine benthic diatoms, on the growth of several strains belonging to the Cylindrotheca closterium diatom species complex. We first tested the effect of 35 different bacterial isolates on the growth of a single C. closterium strain, and then evaluated the impact of 8 of these isolates on the growth of 6 C. closterium strains and 1 Cylindrotheca fusiformis strain. Surprisingly, most interactions were neutral to antagonistic. The interactions were highly specific, with diatom growth in the presence of specific bacteria differing between Cylindrotheca strains and species, and closely related bacteria eliciting contrasting diatom growth responses. These differences could be related to the origin of the bacterial isolates, as only isolates from foreign diatom hosts significantly reduced diatom growth, implying coadaptation between different Cylindrotheca strains and their associated bacteria. Interestingly, the antagonistic effect of a Marinobacter strain was alleviated by the presence of a microbial inoculum that was native to the diatom host, suggesting that coadapted bacteria might also benefit their host indirectly by preventing the establishment of harmful bacteria.}},
  articleno    = {{fiz171}},
  author       = {{Stock, Willem and Blommaert, Lander and De Troch, Marleen and Mangelinckx, Sven and Willems, Anne and Vyverman, Wim and Sabbe, Koen}},
  issn         = {{0168-6496}},
  journal      = {{FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY}},
  keywords     = {{Cylindrotheca,microbial interactions,bacteria-diatom cocultures,coadaptation,microbiome,algal-bacterial interactions,MARINOBACTER-ADHAERENS,PHYLOGENETIC SIGNAL,THALASSIOSIRA-WEISSFLOGII,MICROBIAL INTERACTIONS,ORGANIC-COMPOUNDS,PSEUDO-NITZSCHIA,BENTHIC DIATOMS,MARINE DIATOM,PHYTOPLANKTON,GROWTH}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{11}},
  pages        = {{11}},
  title        = {{Host specificity in diatom-bacteria interactions alleviates antagonistic effects}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fiz171}},
  volume       = {{95}},
  year         = {{2019}},
}

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