Advanced search
1 file | 4.94 MB Add to list

PP7L is essential for MAIL1-mediated transposable element silencing and primary root growth

(2020) PLANT JOURNAL. 102(4). p.703-717
Author
Organization
Abstract
The two paralogous Arabidopsis genes MAINTENANCE OF MERISTEMS (MAIN) and MAINTENANCE OF MERISTEMS LIKE1 (MAIL1) encode a conserved retrotransposon-related plant mobile domain and are known to be required for silencing of transposable elements (TE) and for primary root development. Loss of function of either MAIN or MAIL1 leads to release of heterochromatic TEs, reduced condensation of pericentromeric heterochromatin, cell death of meristem cells and growth arrest of the primary root soon after germination. Here, we show that they act in one protein complex that also contains the inactive isoform of PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 7 (PP7), which is named PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 7-LIKE (PP7L). PP7L was previously shown to be important for chloroplast biogenesis and efficient chloroplast protein synthesis. We show that loss of PP7L function leads to the same root growth phenotype as loss of MAIL1 or MAIN. In addition, pp7l mutants show similar silencing defects. Double mutant analyses confirmed that the three proteins act in the same molecular pathway. The primary root growth arrest, which is associated with cell death of stem cells and their daughter cells, is a consequence of genome instability. Our data demonstrate so far unrecognized functions of an inactive phosphatase isoform in a protein complex that is essential for silencing of heterochromatic elements and for maintenance of genome stability in dividing cells.
Keywords
Plant Science, Genetics, Cell Biology

Downloads

  • de Luxán-Hernández et al. 2020 Plant Journal 102 703.pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 4.94 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Luxán‐Hernández, Cloe, et al. “PP7L Is Essential for MAIL1-Mediated Transposable Element Silencing and Primary Root Growth.” PLANT JOURNAL, vol. 102, no. 4, 2020, pp. 703–17.
APA
Luxán‐Hernández, C., Lohmann, J., Hellmeyer, W., Seanpong, S., Wöltje, K., Magyar, Z., … Weingartner, M. (2020). PP7L is essential for MAIL1-mediated transposable element silencing and primary root growth. PLANT JOURNAL, 102(4), 703–717.
Chicago author-date
Luxán‐Hernández, Cloe, Julia Lohmann, Wiebke Hellmeyer, Senoch Seanpong, Kerstin Wöltje, Zoltan Magyar, Aladár Pettkó‐Szandtner, et al. 2020. “PP7L Is Essential for MAIL1-Mediated Transposable Element Silencing and Primary Root Growth.” PLANT JOURNAL 102 (4): 703–17.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Luxán‐Hernández, Cloe, Julia Lohmann, Wiebke Hellmeyer, Senoch Seanpong, Kerstin Wöltje, Zoltan Magyar, Aladár Pettkó‐Szandtner, Thierry Pélissier, Geert De Jaeger, Stefan Hoth, Olivier Mathieu, and Magdalena Weingartner. 2020. “PP7L Is Essential for MAIL1-Mediated Transposable Element Silencing and Primary Root Growth.” PLANT JOURNAL 102 (4): 703–717.
Vancouver
1.
Luxán‐Hernández C, Lohmann J, Hellmeyer W, Seanpong S, Wöltje K, Magyar Z, et al. PP7L is essential for MAIL1-mediated transposable element silencing and primary root growth. PLANT JOURNAL. 2020;102(4):703–17.
IEEE
[1]
C. Luxán‐Hernández et al., “PP7L is essential for MAIL1-mediated transposable element silencing and primary root growth,” PLANT JOURNAL, vol. 102, no. 4, pp. 703–717, 2020.
@article{8640688,
  abstract     = {The two paralogous Arabidopsis genes MAINTENANCE OF MERISTEMS (MAIN) and MAINTENANCE OF MERISTEMS LIKE1 (MAIL1) encode a conserved retrotransposon-related plant mobile domain and are known to be required for silencing of transposable elements (TE) and for primary root development. Loss of function of either MAIN or MAIL1 leads to release of heterochromatic TEs, reduced condensation of pericentromeric heterochromatin, cell death of meristem cells and growth arrest of the primary root soon after germination. Here, we show that they act in one protein complex that also contains the inactive isoform of PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 7 (PP7), which is named PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 7-LIKE (PP7L). PP7L was previously shown to be important for chloroplast biogenesis and efficient chloroplast protein synthesis. We show that loss of PP7L function leads to the same root growth phenotype as loss of MAIL1 or MAIN. In addition, pp7l mutants show similar silencing defects. Double mutant analyses confirmed that the three proteins act in the same molecular pathway. The primary root growth arrest, which is associated with cell death of stem cells and their daughter cells, is a consequence of genome instability. Our data demonstrate so far unrecognized functions of an inactive phosphatase isoform in a protein complex that is essential for silencing of heterochromatic elements and for maintenance of genome stability in dividing cells.},
  author       = {Luxán‐Hernández, Cloe and Lohmann, Julia and Hellmeyer, Wiebke and Seanpong, Senoch and Wöltje, Kerstin and Magyar, Zoltan and Pettkó‐Szandtner, Aladár and Pélissier, Thierry and De Jaeger, Geert and Hoth, Stefan and Mathieu, Olivier and Weingartner, Magdalena},
  issn         = {0960-7412},
  journal      = {PLANT JOURNAL},
  keywords     = {Plant Science,Genetics,Cell Biology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {703--717},
  title        = {PP7L is essential for MAIL1-mediated transposable element silencing and primary root growth},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tpj.14655},
  volume       = {102},
  year         = {2020},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: