Advanced search
1 file | 1.78 MB Add to list

Please don’t look at me that way. An empirical study into the effects of age-based (meta-)stereotyping on employability enhancement among older supermarket workers

Author
Organization
Abstract
At present, individuals increasingly have to take ownership of their working lives. This situation requires them to self-manage and plan their careers. However, individuals' career management does not happen in a vacuum. Studies have therefore stressed the importance of organizations introducing Sustainable Human Resource Management to share the responsibility for individuals' employability. This is expected to motivate especially disadvantaged workers, such as older workers (>= 50 years) and those working in lower-skilled jobs, to work longer across the life-span. In view of the growing scholarly and societal attention for Sustainable Career Development (SCD), the present study examines the relationships between workers' chronological age (comparing older workers with younger and middle-aged groups, respectively) and dimensions of self-reported employability, and how perceptions of negative (meta-)stereotyping regarding older workers' productivity, reliability, and personal adaptability moderate these relationships. To examine how possible underlying psychological mechanisms can affect individuals' labor market decisions and behaviors, we developed hypotheses derived from socio-emotional selectivity and self-categorization theory, which we tested using data collected among supermarket workers in various age groups (N = 98). Moderated regression analyses showed that, in line with our hypotheses, perceptions of negative age-based (meta-)stereotyping amplifies the negative effect of older workers' age on their self-perceived employability. In particular, we found that: (1) the older worker group reported lower levels of three of the distinguished employability dimensions (i.e., anticipation and optimization, corporate sense, and balance, but not occupational expertise and personal flexibility) and (2) perceptions of stronger negative (meta-)stereotypes regarding older workers in the organization had a moderating effect on the relationship between age group and four of the distinguished employability dimensions (i.e., occupational expertise, anticipation and optimization, corporate sense, and balance, but not personal flexibility). We conclude that age group membership as well as negative age-based (meta-)stereotypes deter older workers from enhancing their employability, which may potentially impact their career decisions and opportunities, especially in view of swift changing labor market demands. We argue, therefore, that Sustainable HR practices should focus on opposing negative age-based (meta-)stereotyping and on creating an inclusive work climate, meanwhile enhancing workers' ambitions and career opportunities over the life cycle.
Keywords
General Psychology, career development, diversity climate, employability, HRM, (meta-)stereotyping, older workers, FUTURE TIME PERSPECTIVE, CAREER, METASTEREOTYPES, MANAGEMENT, WORKPLACE, WOMEN

Downloads

  • Please Don t Look at Me That Way an Empirical Study Into the Effects of Age-Based Meta- Stereotyping on Employability Enhancement Among Older Supermarket Workers.pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.78 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Peters, Pascale, et al. “Please Don’t Look at Me That Way. An Empirical Study into the Effects of Age-Based (Meta-)Stereotyping on Employability Enhancement among Older Supermarket Workers.” FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, vol. 10, 2019.
APA
Peters, P., van der Heijden, B., Spurk, D., De Vos, A., & Klaassen, R. (2019). Please don’t look at me that way. An empirical study into the effects of age-based (meta-)stereotyping on employability enhancement among older supermarket workers. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 10.
Chicago author-date
Peters, Pascale, Beatrice van der Heijden, Daniel Spurk, Ans De Vos, and Renate Klaassen. 2019. “Please Don’t Look at Me That Way. An Empirical Study into the Effects of Age-Based (Meta-)Stereotyping on Employability Enhancement among Older Supermarket Workers.” FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY 10.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Peters, Pascale, Beatrice van der Heijden, Daniel Spurk, Ans De Vos, and Renate Klaassen. 2019. “Please Don’t Look at Me That Way. An Empirical Study into the Effects of Age-Based (Meta-)Stereotyping on Employability Enhancement among Older Supermarket Workers.” FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY 10.
Vancouver
1.
Peters P, van der Heijden B, Spurk D, De Vos A, Klaassen R. Please don’t look at me that way. An empirical study into the effects of age-based (meta-)stereotyping on employability enhancement among older supermarket workers. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 2019;10.
IEEE
[1]
P. Peters, B. van der Heijden, D. Spurk, A. De Vos, and R. Klaassen, “Please don’t look at me that way. An empirical study into the effects of age-based (meta-)stereotyping on employability enhancement among older supermarket workers,” FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, vol. 10, 2019.
@article{8639047,
  abstract     = {At present, individuals increasingly have to take ownership of their working lives. This situation requires them to self-manage and plan their careers. However, individuals' career management does not happen in a vacuum. Studies have therefore stressed the importance of organizations introducing Sustainable Human Resource Management to share the responsibility for individuals' employability. This is expected to motivate especially disadvantaged workers, such as older workers (>= 50 years) and those working in lower-skilled jobs, to work longer across the life-span. In view of the growing scholarly and societal attention for Sustainable Career Development (SCD), the present study examines the relationships between workers' chronological age (comparing older workers with younger and middle-aged groups, respectively) and dimensions of self-reported employability, and how perceptions of negative (meta-)stereotyping regarding older workers' productivity, reliability, and personal adaptability moderate these relationships. To examine how possible underlying psychological mechanisms can affect individuals' labor market decisions and behaviors, we developed hypotheses derived from socio-emotional selectivity and self-categorization theory, which we tested using data collected among supermarket workers in various age groups (N = 98). Moderated regression analyses showed that, in line with our hypotheses, perceptions of negative age-based (meta-)stereotyping amplifies the negative effect of older workers' age on their self-perceived employability. In particular, we found that: (1) the older worker group reported lower levels of three of the distinguished employability dimensions (i.e., anticipation and optimization, corporate sense, and balance, but not occupational expertise and personal flexibility) and (2) perceptions of stronger negative (meta-)stereotypes regarding older workers in the organization had a moderating effect on the relationship between age group and four of the distinguished employability dimensions (i.e., occupational expertise, anticipation and optimization, corporate sense, and balance, but not personal flexibility). We conclude that age group membership as well as negative age-based (meta-)stereotypes deter older workers from enhancing their employability, which may potentially impact their career decisions and opportunities, especially in view of swift changing labor market demands. We argue, therefore, that Sustainable HR practices should focus on opposing negative age-based (meta-)stereotyping and on creating an inclusive work climate, meanwhile enhancing workers' ambitions and career opportunities over the life cycle.},
  articleno    = {249},
  author       = {Peters, Pascale and van der Heijden, Beatrice and Spurk, Daniel and De Vos, Ans and Klaassen, Renate},
  issn         = {1664-1078},
  journal      = {FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY},
  keywords     = {General Psychology,career development,diversity climate,employability,HRM,(meta-)stereotyping,older workers,FUTURE TIME PERSPECTIVE,CAREER,METASTEREOTYPES,MANAGEMENT,WORKPLACE,WOMEN},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {14},
  title        = {Please don’t look at me that way. An empirical study into the effects of age-based (meta-)stereotyping on employability enhancement among older supermarket workers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00249},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2019},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: