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Medical treatment of urinary incontinence in the bitch

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Abstract
Urinary incontinence, an uncontrolled urine leakage during the storage phase of micturition, is a common condition in female dogs. In intact bitches, the reported prevalence is only 0.2-0.3%, but in spayed bitches it varies between 3.1-20.1%. Most commonly, dogs with acquired urinary incontinence suffer from urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence. This condition seems to be multifactorial, and although the exact pathophysiology remains unclear, potential risk factors include gender, gonadectomy, breed, body weight, urethral length and bladder neck position. In daily practice, the diagnosis of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence is usually made after eliminating other potential causes of urinary incontinence. Incontinent bitches are primarily treated with medications, such as alpha-adrenergic drugs, e.g. phenylpropanolamine and oestrogens. Surgery is recommended when patients become refractory to medical treatment.
Keywords
SPHINCTER MECHANISM INCOMPETENCE, URETHRAL PRESSURE PROFILE, SPAYED, BITCHES, RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS, DOGS, PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE, PREVALENCE, RISK, MANAGEMENT, DIAGNOSIS

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Timmermans, Joep, et al. “Medical Treatment of Urinary Incontinence in the Bitch.” VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT, vol. 88, no. 1, 2019, pp. 3–8.
APA
Timmermans, J., Van Goethem, B., De Rooster, H., & Paepe, D. (2019). Medical treatment of urinary incontinence in the bitch. VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT, 88(1), 3–8.
Chicago author-date
Timmermans, Joep, Bart Van Goethem, Hilde De Rooster, and Dominique Paepe. 2019. “Medical Treatment of Urinary Incontinence in the Bitch.” VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT 88 (1): 3–8.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Timmermans, Joep, Bart Van Goethem, Hilde De Rooster, and Dominique Paepe. 2019. “Medical Treatment of Urinary Incontinence in the Bitch.” VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT 88 (1): 3–8.
Vancouver
1.
Timmermans J, Van Goethem B, De Rooster H, Paepe D. Medical treatment of urinary incontinence in the bitch. VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT. 2019;88(1):3–8.
IEEE
[1]
J. Timmermans, B. Van Goethem, H. De Rooster, and D. Paepe, “Medical treatment of urinary incontinence in the bitch,” VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT, vol. 88, no. 1, pp. 3–8, 2019.
@article{8637878,
  abstract     = {Urinary incontinence, an uncontrolled urine leakage during the storage phase of micturition, is a common condition in female dogs. In intact bitches, the reported prevalence is only 0.2-0.3%, but in spayed bitches it varies between 3.1-20.1%. Most commonly, dogs with acquired urinary incontinence suffer from urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence. This condition seems to be multifactorial, and although the exact pathophysiology remains unclear, potential risk factors include gender, gonadectomy, breed, body weight, urethral length and bladder neck position. In daily practice, the diagnosis of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence is usually made after eliminating other potential causes of urinary incontinence. Incontinent bitches are primarily treated with medications, such as alpha-adrenergic drugs, e.g. phenylpropanolamine and oestrogens. Surgery is recommended when patients become refractory to medical treatment.},
  author       = {Timmermans, Joep and Van Goethem, Bart and De Rooster, Hilde and Paepe, Dominique},
  issn         = {0303-9021},
  journal      = {VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT},
  keywords     = {SPHINCTER MECHANISM INCOMPETENCE,URETHRAL PRESSURE PROFILE,SPAYED,BITCHES,RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS,DOGS,PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE,PREVALENCE,RISK,MANAGEMENT,DIAGNOSIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {3--8},
  title        = {Medical treatment of urinary incontinence in the bitch},
  volume       = {88},
  year         = {2019},
}

Web of Science
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