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Somatosensory attending to the lower back is associated with response speed of movements signaling back pain

Amanda Clauwaert (UGent) , Emiel Cracco (UGent) , Stijn Schouppe (UGent) , Jessica Van Oosterwijck (UGent) , Lieven Danneels (UGent) and Stefaan Van Damme (UGent)
(2019) BRAIN RESEARCH. 1723.
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Abstract
The present study investigated if preparing a movement that is expected to evoke pain results in hesitation to initiate the movement (i.e., avoidance) and, especially, if the allocation of attention to the threatened body part mediates such effect. To this end, healthy volunteers (N = 33) performed a postural perturbation task recruiting lower back muscles. In 'threat trials', the movement was sometimes followed by an experimental pain stimulus on the back, whereas in 'no-threat trials', a non-painful control stimulus was applied. Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to assess attending to the lower back. Specifically, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) to task-irrelevant tactile stimuli administered to the lower back were recorded during movement preparation. Reaction times (RTs) were recorded to assess movement initiation. The results revealed faster responses and enhanced somatosensory attending to the lower back on threat trials than on no-threat trials. Importantly, the amplitude of the N95 SEP component predicted RTs and was found to partially mediate the effect of pain anticipation on movement initiation. These findings suggest that somatosensory attending might be a potential mechanism by which pain anticipation can modulate motor execution.
Keywords
ATTENTIONAL MODULATION, EVOKED-POTENTIALS, FEAR, ACQUISITION, ANTICIPATION, BEHAVIOR, CORTEX, MODEL, Pain, Somatosensory attention, Sensorimotor, EEG

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MLA
Clauwaert, Amanda, et al. “Somatosensory Attending to the Lower Back Is Associated with Response Speed of Movements Signaling Back Pain.” BRAIN RESEARCH, vol. 1723, 2019.
APA
Clauwaert, A., Cracco, E., Schouppe, S., Van Oosterwijck, J., Danneels, L., & Van Damme, S. (2019). Somatosensory attending to the lower back is associated with response speed of movements signaling back pain. BRAIN RESEARCH, 1723.
Chicago author-date
Clauwaert, Amanda, Emiel Cracco, Stijn Schouppe, Jessica Van Oosterwijck, Lieven Danneels, and Stefaan Van Damme. 2019. “Somatosensory Attending to the Lower Back Is Associated with Response Speed of Movements Signaling Back Pain.” BRAIN RESEARCH 1723.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Clauwaert, Amanda, Emiel Cracco, Stijn Schouppe, Jessica Van Oosterwijck, Lieven Danneels, and Stefaan Van Damme. 2019. “Somatosensory Attending to the Lower Back Is Associated with Response Speed of Movements Signaling Back Pain.” BRAIN RESEARCH 1723.
Vancouver
1.
Clauwaert A, Cracco E, Schouppe S, Van Oosterwijck J, Danneels L, Van Damme S. Somatosensory attending to the lower back is associated with response speed of movements signaling back pain. BRAIN RESEARCH. 2019;1723.
IEEE
[1]
A. Clauwaert, E. Cracco, S. Schouppe, J. Van Oosterwijck, L. Danneels, and S. Van Damme, “Somatosensory attending to the lower back is associated with response speed of movements signaling back pain,” BRAIN RESEARCH, vol. 1723, 2019.
@article{8637129,
  abstract     = {The present study investigated if preparing a movement that is expected to evoke pain results in hesitation to initiate the movement (i.e., avoidance) and, especially, if the allocation of attention to the threatened body part mediates such effect. To this end, healthy volunteers (N = 33) performed a postural perturbation task recruiting lower back muscles. In 'threat trials', the movement was sometimes followed by an experimental pain stimulus on the back, whereas in 'no-threat trials', a non-painful control stimulus was applied. Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to assess attending to the lower back. Specifically, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) to task-irrelevant tactile stimuli administered to the lower back were recorded during movement preparation. Reaction times (RTs) were recorded to assess movement initiation. The results revealed faster responses and enhanced somatosensory attending to the lower back on threat trials than on no-threat trials. Importantly, the amplitude of the N95 SEP component predicted RTs and was found to partially mediate the effect of pain anticipation on movement initiation. These findings suggest that somatosensory attending might be a potential mechanism by which pain anticipation can modulate motor execution.},
  articleno    = {146383},
  author       = {Clauwaert, Amanda and Cracco, Emiel and Schouppe, Stijn and Van Oosterwijck, Jessica and Danneels, Lieven and Van Damme, Stefaan},
  issn         = {0006-8993},
  journal      = {BRAIN RESEARCH},
  keywords     = {ATTENTIONAL MODULATION,EVOKED-POTENTIALS,FEAR,ACQUISITION,ANTICIPATION,BEHAVIOR,CORTEX,MODEL,Pain,Somatosensory attention,Sensorimotor,EEG},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {8},
  title        = {Somatosensory attending to the lower back is associated with response speed of movements signaling back pain},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2019.146383},
  volume       = {1723},
  year         = {2019},
}

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