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Acute cortisol levels and memory performance in older people with high and normal Body Mass Index

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Abstract
Previous studies have shown that healthy older adults may be less sensitive to the effects of acute cortisol levels on memory performance than young adults. Importantly, being overweight has recently been associated with an increase in both cortisol concentration and cortisol receptors in central tissues, suggesting that Body Mass Index (BMI) may contribute to differences in the relationship between memory and acute cortisol. This study investigates the role of BMI in the relationship between memory performance and acute cortisol levels in older people (M = 64.70 years; SD = 4.24). We measured cortisol levels and memory performance (working memory and declarative memory) in 33 participants with normal BMI (normal BMI = 18.50-24.99) and 36 participants with overweight BMI (overweight BMI = 25-29.99). Overweight BMI participants showed worse performance on word-list learning (p = .036, 95% CI [0.08, 2.18], eta(2)(p) = 0.07). Higher cortisol levels were related to higher proactive interference (beta = .364, p = .016, 95% CI [0.07, 0.66]), and BMI did not moderate any of the relationships investigated. In accordance with previous studies, our results show worse memory performance in individuals with overweight BMI. However, our results do not support the idea that memory performance in older people with higher BMI may be more sensitive to differences in acute cortisol levels than in older people with normal BMI. More research is needed to test this hypothesis with obese individuals (BMI > 30 Kg/cm(2)).
Keywords
body mass index, cortisol, memory, older people, overweight, LONG-TERM-MEMORY, COGNITIVE FUNCTION, ACUTE STRESS, EMOTIONAL FACES, WORKING-MEMORY, OBESITY, YOUNG, IMPAIRMENT, RETRIEVAL, RESPONSES

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MLA
Pulópulos Tripiana, Matias, et al. “Acute Cortisol Levels and Memory Performance in Older People with High and Normal Body Mass Index.” SPANISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, vol. 22, 2019, doi:10.1017/sjp.2019.44.
APA
Pulópulos Tripiana, M., Puig Perez, S., Hidalgo, V., Montoliu, T., & Salvador, A. (2019). Acute cortisol levels and memory performance in older people with high and normal Body Mass Index. SPANISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 22. https://doi.org/10.1017/sjp.2019.44
Chicago author-date
Pulópulos Tripiana, Matias, Sara Puig Perez, Vanesa Hidalgo, Teresa Montoliu, and Alicia Salvador. 2019. “Acute Cortisol Levels and Memory Performance in Older People with High and Normal Body Mass Index.” SPANISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY 22. https://doi.org/10.1017/sjp.2019.44.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Pulópulos Tripiana, Matias, Sara Puig Perez, Vanesa Hidalgo, Teresa Montoliu, and Alicia Salvador. 2019. “Acute Cortisol Levels and Memory Performance in Older People with High and Normal Body Mass Index.” SPANISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY 22. doi:10.1017/sjp.2019.44.
Vancouver
1.
Pulópulos Tripiana M, Puig Perez S, Hidalgo V, Montoliu T, Salvador A. Acute cortisol levels and memory performance in older people with high and normal Body Mass Index. SPANISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY. 2019;22.
IEEE
[1]
M. Pulópulos Tripiana, S. Puig Perez, V. Hidalgo, T. Montoliu, and A. Salvador, “Acute cortisol levels and memory performance in older people with high and normal Body Mass Index,” SPANISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, vol. 22, 2019.
@article{8636990,
  abstract     = {Previous studies have shown that healthy older adults may be less sensitive to the effects of acute cortisol levels on memory performance than young adults. Importantly, being overweight has recently been associated with an increase in both cortisol concentration and cortisol receptors in central tissues, suggesting that Body Mass Index (BMI) may contribute to differences in the relationship between memory and acute cortisol. This study investigates the role of BMI in the relationship between memory performance and acute cortisol levels in older people (M = 64.70 years; SD = 4.24). We measured cortisol levels and memory performance (working memory and declarative memory) in 33 participants with normal BMI (normal BMI = 18.50-24.99) and 36 participants with overweight BMI (overweight BMI = 25-29.99). Overweight BMI participants showed worse performance on word-list learning (p = .036, 95% CI [0.08, 2.18], eta(2)(p) = 0.07). Higher cortisol levels were related to higher proactive interference (beta = .364, p = .016, 95% CI [0.07, 0.66]), and BMI did not moderate any of the relationships investigated. In accordance with previous studies, our results show worse memory performance in individuals with overweight BMI. However, our results do not support the idea that memory performance in older people with higher BMI may be more sensitive to differences in acute cortisol levels than in older people with normal BMI. More research is needed to test this hypothesis with obese individuals (BMI > 30 Kg/cm(2)).},
  articleno    = {e41},
  author       = {Pulópulos Tripiana, Matias and Puig Perez, Sara and Hidalgo, Vanesa and Montoliu, Teresa and Salvador, Alicia},
  issn         = {1138-7416},
  journal      = {SPANISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY},
  keywords     = {body mass index,cortisol,memory,older people,overweight,LONG-TERM-MEMORY,COGNITIVE FUNCTION,ACUTE STRESS,EMOTIONAL FACES,WORKING-MEMORY,OBESITY,YOUNG,IMPAIRMENT,RETRIEVAL,RESPONSES},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {9},
  title        = {Acute cortisol levels and memory performance in older people with high and normal Body Mass Index},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/sjp.2019.44},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2019},
}

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