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Intensification of Ethiopian coffee agroforestry drives impoverishment of the Arabica coffee flower visiting bee and fly communities

(2019) AGROFORESTRY SYSTEMS. 93(5). p.1729-1739
Author
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Abstract
Intensively managed shade coffee plantations are expanding in SW Ethiopia, at the cost of the more natural coffee agroforestry systems. Here, we investigated consequences for the potential pollinator community of Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica L.) in its natural range. We surveyed coffee flower visitors at six different sites in the Jimma region in SW Ethiopia, and compared species richness and abundance between semi-natural coffee forests and shaded coffee plantations. Overall, we found six bee (Hymenoptera: Anthophila) and twenty fly species (Diptera: Brachycera) visiting C. arabica flowers. Species richness and overall abundance of flower visitors was significantly higher in the semi-natural forests compared to the plantations. A significantly higher abundance of non-Apis bees and hoverflies (Syrphidae) visiting C. arabica flowers was observed in the semi-natural forest plots, but numbers for other Diptera and honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) did not differ significantly between the agroforestry systems. Our results show an impoverishment of the coffee flower visiting insect community in response to agricultural intensification. This suggests a functional shift of the coffee pollinator community and, hence, may influence the stability of the provided pollination ecosystem services and coffee yield in the long term. We did, however, not quantify pollination services in this study.
Keywords
Coffea arabica, Anthophila, Brachycera, Flower visitors, Moist Afromontane forest, APIS-MELLIFERA HYMENOPTERA, RAIN-FOREST, HONEY-BEES, MANAGEMENT INTENSITY, POLLINATOR ACTIVITY, TROPICAL FOREST, FRUIT-SET, DIVERSITY, BIODIVERSITY, PLANT

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Citation

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MLA
Geeraert, L., et al. “Intensification of Ethiopian Coffee Agroforestry Drives Impoverishment of the Arabica Coffee Flower Visiting Bee and Fly Communities.” AGROFORESTRY SYSTEMS, vol. 93, no. 5, 2019, pp. 1729–39.
APA
Geeraert, L., Aerts, R., Jordaens, K., Dox, I., Wellens, S., Couri, M., … Honnay, O. (2019). Intensification of Ethiopian coffee agroforestry drives impoverishment of the Arabica coffee flower visiting bee and fly communities. AGROFORESTRY SYSTEMS, 93(5), 1729–1739.
Chicago author-date
Geeraert, L, R Aerts, K Jordaens, I Dox, Siel Wellens, M Couri, G Berecha, and O Honnay. 2019. “Intensification of Ethiopian Coffee Agroforestry Drives Impoverishment of the Arabica Coffee Flower Visiting Bee and Fly Communities.” AGROFORESTRY SYSTEMS 93 (5): 1729–39.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Geeraert, L, R Aerts, K Jordaens, I Dox, Siel Wellens, M Couri, G Berecha, and O Honnay. 2019. “Intensification of Ethiopian Coffee Agroforestry Drives Impoverishment of the Arabica Coffee Flower Visiting Bee and Fly Communities.” AGROFORESTRY SYSTEMS 93 (5): 1729–1739.
Vancouver
1.
Geeraert L, Aerts R, Jordaens K, Dox I, Wellens S, Couri M, et al. Intensification of Ethiopian coffee agroforestry drives impoverishment of the Arabica coffee flower visiting bee and fly communities. AGROFORESTRY SYSTEMS. 2019;93(5):1729–39.
IEEE
[1]
L. Geeraert et al., “Intensification of Ethiopian coffee agroforestry drives impoverishment of the Arabica coffee flower visiting bee and fly communities,” AGROFORESTRY SYSTEMS, vol. 93, no. 5, pp. 1729–1739, 2019.
@article{8636707,
  abstract     = {Intensively managed shade coffee plantations are expanding in SW Ethiopia, at the cost of the more natural coffee agroforestry systems. Here, we investigated consequences for the potential pollinator community of Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica L.) in its natural range. We surveyed coffee flower visitors at six different sites in the Jimma region in SW Ethiopia, and compared species richness and abundance between semi-natural coffee forests and shaded coffee plantations. Overall, we found six bee (Hymenoptera: Anthophila) and twenty fly species (Diptera: Brachycera) visiting C. arabica flowers. Species richness and overall abundance of flower visitors was significantly higher in the semi-natural forests compared to the plantations. A significantly higher abundance of non-Apis bees and hoverflies (Syrphidae) visiting C. arabica flowers was observed in the semi-natural forest plots, but numbers for other Diptera and honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) did not differ significantly between the agroforestry systems. Our results show an impoverishment of the coffee flower visiting insect community in response to agricultural intensification. This suggests a functional shift of the coffee pollinator community and, hence, may influence the stability of the provided pollination ecosystem services and coffee yield in the long term. We did, however, not quantify pollination services in this study.},
  author       = {Geeraert, L and Aerts, R and Jordaens, K and Dox, I and Wellens, Siel and Couri, M and Berecha, G and Honnay, O},
  issn         = {0167-4366},
  journal      = {AGROFORESTRY SYSTEMS},
  keywords     = {Coffea arabica,Anthophila,Brachycera,Flower visitors,Moist Afromontane forest,APIS-MELLIFERA HYMENOPTERA,RAIN-FOREST,HONEY-BEES,MANAGEMENT INTENSITY,POLLINATOR ACTIVITY,TROPICAL FOREST,FRUIT-SET,DIVERSITY,BIODIVERSITY,PLANT},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Blacksburg, VA, USA},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1729--1739},
  title        = {Intensification of Ethiopian coffee agroforestry drives impoverishment of the Arabica coffee flower visiting bee and fly communities},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10457-018-0280-0},
  volume       = {93},
  year         = {2019},
}

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