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Effective connectivity modulations related to win and loss outcomes

Frederik Van de Steen (UGent) , Ruth Krebs (UGent) , Nigel Colenbier (UGent) , Hannes Almgren (UGent) and Daniele Marinazzo (UGent)
(2020) NEUROIMAGE. 207.
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Abstract
Previous studies have characterized the brain regions involved in encoding monetary reward and punishment outcomes. The question of how this information is integrated across brain regions has received less attention. Here, we investigated changes in effective connectivity related to the processing of positive and negative monetary outcomes using functional magnetic resonance imaging data from the Human Connectome Project. Specifically, subjects engaged in a card guessing game which could yield win, loss, or neutral outcomes. A general linear model was used to define a network of regions involved in win and loss outcome processing, including anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and ventral striatum. Dynamic causal modelling (DCM) was implemented to study between-region couplings and outcome-related modulations thereof within this network. In addition, we explored the relation between effective connectivity patterns and choice behavior in the gambling task. Parametric empirical Bayesian modelling was conducted for group-level inferences of both DCM and the choice behavior. Behaviorally, both win and loss outcomes increased the probability of choice switches in subsequent gambles. In terms of connectivity, win outcomes were associated with increased extrinsic connectivity across the network, while loss outcomes featured a balance between increased and decreased extrinsic connectivity. Moreover, self-inhibitory connections tended to decrease for both win and loss outcomes. Interestingly, a substantial discrepancy was observed for occipital cortex connectivity, which was characterized by intrinsic disinhibition in loss but not in win trials. The observed differences in effective connectivity during the processing of positive and negative outcomes, despite similarities in average regional activity and choice behavior, highlight the value of exploring network dynamics in the context of incentive manipulations.
Keywords
Cognitive Neuroscience, Neurology

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MLA
Van de Steen, Frederik, et al. “Effective Connectivity Modulations Related to Win and Loss Outcomes.” NEUROIMAGE, vol. 207, 2020.
APA
Van de Steen, F., Krebs, R., Colenbier, N., Almgren, H., & Marinazzo, D. (2020). Effective connectivity modulations related to win and loss outcomes. NEUROIMAGE, 207.
Chicago author-date
Van de Steen, Frederik, Ruth Krebs, Nigel Colenbier, Hannes Almgren, and Daniele Marinazzo. 2020. “Effective Connectivity Modulations Related to Win and Loss Outcomes.” NEUROIMAGE 207.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van de Steen, Frederik, Ruth Krebs, Nigel Colenbier, Hannes Almgren, and Daniele Marinazzo. 2020. “Effective Connectivity Modulations Related to Win and Loss Outcomes.” NEUROIMAGE 207.
Vancouver
1.
Van de Steen F, Krebs R, Colenbier N, Almgren H, Marinazzo D. Effective connectivity modulations related to win and loss outcomes. NEUROIMAGE. 2020;207.
IEEE
[1]
F. Van de Steen, R. Krebs, N. Colenbier, H. Almgren, and D. Marinazzo, “Effective connectivity modulations related to win and loss outcomes,” NEUROIMAGE, vol. 207, 2020.
@article{8636019,
  abstract     = {Previous studies have characterized the brain regions involved in encoding monetary reward and punishment outcomes. The question of how this information is integrated across brain regions has received less attention. Here, we investigated changes in effective connectivity related to the processing of positive and negative monetary outcomes using functional magnetic resonance imaging data from the Human Connectome Project. Specifically, subjects engaged in a card guessing game which could yield win, loss, or neutral outcomes. A general linear model was used to define a network of regions involved in win and loss outcome processing, including anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and ventral striatum. Dynamic causal modelling (DCM) was implemented to study between-region couplings and outcome-related modulations thereof within this network. In addition, we explored the relation between effective connectivity patterns and choice behavior in the gambling task. Parametric empirical Bayesian modelling was conducted for group-level inferences of both DCM and the choice behavior. Behaviorally, both win and loss outcomes increased the probability of choice switches in subsequent gambles. In terms of connectivity, win outcomes were associated with increased extrinsic connectivity across the network, while loss outcomes featured a balance between increased and decreased extrinsic connectivity. Moreover, self-inhibitory connections tended to decrease for both win and loss outcomes. Interestingly, a substantial discrepancy was observed for occipital cortex connectivity, which was characterized by intrinsic disinhibition in loss but not in win trials. The observed differences in effective connectivity during the processing of positive and negative outcomes, despite similarities in average regional activity and choice behavior, highlight the value of exploring network dynamics in the context of incentive manipulations.},
  articleno    = {116369},
  author       = {Van de Steen, Frederik and Krebs, Ruth and Colenbier, Nigel and Almgren, Hannes and Marinazzo, Daniele},
  issn         = {1053-8119},
  journal      = {NEUROIMAGE},
  keywords     = {Cognitive Neuroscience,Neurology},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {10},
  title        = {Effective connectivity modulations related to win and loss outcomes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116369},
  volume       = {207},
  year         = {2020},
}

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