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Towards identifying customer profiles in reactions to financial overcompensation : the role of self-interest and fairness sensitivity in explaining who prefers more money

(2019) JOURNAL OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR. 18(3). p.261-271
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Abstract
In the aftermath of a product failure, companies often offer a financial compensation. The present research compares the effects of equal compensation (i.e., a refund that is equivalent to the purchase price) and large overcompensation (i.e., a refund that is five times larger than the purchase price) on customer loyalty, which was hypothesized to be moderated by individual differences in self-interest and fairness sensitivity. Our results, first of all, revealed that, overall, large overcompensation does not result in higher customer loyalty than equal compensation. Although overcompensation does not appear to be a worthwhile strategy in general, our results also showed that large overcompensation nonetheless entails positive effects for a particular type of customer. Indeed, relative to equal compensation, overcompensation had an incremental effect on customer loyalty for customers low on perpetrator fairness sensitivity and for customers high on victim fairness sensitivity. Variables related to self-interest (i.e., materialism and greed) did not demonstrate such a moderation effect. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
Keywords
LOW-PRICE GUARANTEES, PERSONALITY, COMPENSATION, SERVICE, LOYALTY, RECIPROCITY, JUSTICE, CHOICE, EQUITY

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MLA
Haesevoets, Tessa, et al. “Towards Identifying Customer Profiles in Reactions to Financial Overcompensation : The Role of Self-Interest and Fairness Sensitivity in Explaining Who Prefers More Money.” JOURNAL OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR, vol. 18, no. 3, 2019, pp. 261–71.
APA
Haesevoets, T., Van Hiel, A., Pandelaere, M., & De Cremer, D. (2019). Towards identifying customer profiles in reactions to financial overcompensation : the role of self-interest and fairness sensitivity in explaining who prefers more money. JOURNAL OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR, 18(3), 261–271.
Chicago author-date
Haesevoets, Tessa, Alain Van Hiel, Mario Pandelaere, and David De Cremer. 2019. “Towards Identifying Customer Profiles in Reactions to Financial Overcompensation : The Role of Self-Interest and Fairness Sensitivity in Explaining Who Prefers More Money.” JOURNAL OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR 18 (3): 261–71.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Haesevoets, Tessa, Alain Van Hiel, Mario Pandelaere, and David De Cremer. 2019. “Towards Identifying Customer Profiles in Reactions to Financial Overcompensation : The Role of Self-Interest and Fairness Sensitivity in Explaining Who Prefers More Money.” JOURNAL OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR 18 (3): 261–271.
Vancouver
1.
Haesevoets T, Van Hiel A, Pandelaere M, De Cremer D. Towards identifying customer profiles in reactions to financial overcompensation : the role of self-interest and fairness sensitivity in explaining who prefers more money. JOURNAL OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR. 2019;18(3):261–71.
IEEE
[1]
T. Haesevoets, A. Van Hiel, M. Pandelaere, and D. De Cremer, “Towards identifying customer profiles in reactions to financial overcompensation : the role of self-interest and fairness sensitivity in explaining who prefers more money,” JOURNAL OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 261–271, 2019.
@article{8635403,
  abstract     = {In the aftermath of a product failure, companies often offer a financial compensation. The present research compares the effects of equal compensation (i.e., a refund that is equivalent to the purchase price) and large overcompensation (i.e., a refund that is five times larger than the purchase price) on customer loyalty, which was hypothesized to be moderated by individual differences in self-interest and fairness sensitivity. Our results, first of all, revealed that, overall, large overcompensation does not result in higher customer loyalty than equal compensation. Although overcompensation does not appear to be a worthwhile strategy in general, our results also showed that large overcompensation nonetheless entails positive effects for a particular type of customer. Indeed, relative to equal compensation, overcompensation had an incremental effect on customer loyalty for customers low on perpetrator fairness sensitivity and for customers high on victim fairness sensitivity. Variables related to self-interest (i.e., materialism and greed) did not demonstrate such a moderation effect. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.},
  author       = {Haesevoets, Tessa and Van Hiel, Alain and Pandelaere, Mario and De Cremer, David},
  issn         = {1472-0817},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR},
  keywords     = {LOW-PRICE GUARANTEES,PERSONALITY,COMPENSATION,SERVICE,LOYALTY,RECIPROCITY,JUSTICE,CHOICE,EQUITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {261--271},
  title        = {Towards identifying customer profiles in reactions to financial overcompensation : the role of self-interest and fairness sensitivity in explaining who prefers more money},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cb.1762},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2019},
}

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