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LAUSANNE-VIDY: FROM SINGLE TO SOCIAL?

(2019)
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Abstract
Chamblandes burials were classified during the 19th century, and later radiocarbon-dated to the Neolithique Moyen (4500-3500 B.C.) within Switzerland and parts of France and Italy. Earlier research suggested that collective burials developed within Chamblandes stone coffins in two distinct phases: first, only single burials in a stone coffin never reopened, later placing multiple and sequential burials by reusing the same coffin. During my theses, I conducted studies on aspects of Chamblandes burials in Switzerland: first, a general comparison of burial sites, with a main goal of working out possible trends in treatment of entombed individuals concerning their age and sex. As a follow-up analysis, the exceptionally well documented necropolis of Lausanne-Vidy - one of several sites of the the late 5th to middle 4th millennium B.C. in Western Switzerland clustered around Lake Geneva - was studied for demographic as well as spatial and temporal distributions. As a swiss key site, where single and multiple burials occur together, it constitutes an excellent data pool for understanding the ritual changes of that time. Based on the anthropological data it was possible to study demographic factors and social structures of the burial community and giving additional information on the sequence of single and collective burials through time and space. Generally, burials showed a large share of individuals deceased at a young age. While grave goods are rare within Chamblandes context, at Lausanne-Vidy especially children were buried with imperishable goods, mainly jewellery. Based on the burials‘ distribution and density, combined with demographic data, it became clear that rather than graves embodying family relationships, the necropolis represents a village community. Results showed that collective burials already start with the beginning of the necropolis, making a two phase model unlikely, and that there was almost no distinction in treatment regarding age or sex of the deceased.
Keywords
Chamblandes, Switzerland, Neolithic

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MLA
Jungnickel, Katharina. LAUSANNE-VIDY: FROM SINGLE TO SOCIAL? 2019.
APA
Jungnickel, K. (2019). LAUSANNE-VIDY: FROM SINGLE TO SOCIAL? Presented at the 25th EAA Annual Meeting, Bern.
Chicago author-date
Jungnickel, Katharina. 2019. “LAUSANNE-VIDY: FROM SINGLE TO SOCIAL?” In .
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Jungnickel, Katharina. 2019. “LAUSANNE-VIDY: FROM SINGLE TO SOCIAL?” In .
Vancouver
1.
Jungnickel K. LAUSANNE-VIDY: FROM SINGLE TO SOCIAL? In 2019.
IEEE
[1]
K. Jungnickel, “LAUSANNE-VIDY: FROM SINGLE TO SOCIAL?,” presented at the 25th EAA Annual Meeting, Bern, 2019.
@inproceedings{8635335,
  abstract     = {Chamblandes burials were classified during the 19th century, and later radiocarbon-dated to the Neolithique Moyen (4500-3500 B.C.) within Switzerland and parts of France and Italy. Earlier research suggested that collective burials developed within Chamblandes stone coffins in two distinct phases: first, only single burials in a stone coffin never reopened, later placing multiple and sequential burials by reusing the same coffin.
During my theses, I conducted studies on aspects of Chamblandes burials in Switzerland: first, a general comparison of burial sites, with a main goal of working out possible trends in treatment of entombed individuals concerning their age and sex.
As a follow-up analysis, the exceptionally well documented necropolis of Lausanne-Vidy - one of several sites of the the late 5th to middle 4th millennium B.C. in Western Switzerland clustered around Lake Geneva - was studied for demographic as well as spatial and temporal distributions. As a swiss key site, where single and multiple burials occur together, it constitutes an excellent data pool for understanding the ritual changes of that time.
Based on the anthropological data it was possible to study demographic factors and social structures of the burial community and giving additional information on the sequence of single and collective burials through time and space.
Generally, burials showed a large share of individuals deceased at a young age. While grave goods are rare within Chamblandes context, at Lausanne-Vidy especially children were buried with imperishable goods, mainly jewellery.
Based on the burials‘ distribution and density, combined with demographic data, it became clear that rather than graves embodying family relationships, the necropolis represents a village community.
Results showed that collective burials already start with the beginning of the necropolis, making a two phase model unlikely, and that there was almost no distinction in treatment regarding age or sex of the deceased.},
  author       = {Jungnickel, Katharina},
  keywords     = {Chamblandes,Switzerland,Neolithic},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Bern},
  title        = {LAUSANNE-VIDY: FROM SINGLE TO SOCIAL?},
  year         = {2019},
}