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Reading text when studying in a second language : an eye‐tracking study

Nicolas Dirix (UGent) , Heleen Vander Beken (UGent) , Ellen De Bruyne (UGent) , Marc Brysbaert (UGent) and Wouter Duyck (UGent)
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Abstract
The authors investigated how eye movements are influenced by different reading goals in participants' first (L1) and second language (L2). Participants read or studied the contents of texts while their eye movements were recorded. One group was asked to read L1 and L2 texts as they would read any expository text (informational reading). Another group was asked to study L1 and L2 texts for subsequent tests involving true/false questions (study condition). After reading, all participants, including those in the informational reading condition, completed the true/false tests without being able to further consult the texts, which allowed the authors to investigate the extent to which reading goal and text language affect recognition memory for texts. In general, more reading time was spent on studying than on informational reading, which also resulted in higher test scores in the study condition. The L2-processing cost was larger in the study condition than in the informational reading condition: Participants needed approximately 20% more time to study L2 texts. The results of various eye movement measures suggest that this is caused by slower word recognition processes and a smaller amount of information that can be processed simultaneously in L2. This was true not only for the first reading of the text but also for the rereadings in the study condition. Interestingly, the additional time for L2 studying seemed to compensate for the less efficient processing, as the recognition test scores were the same in L2 as in L1.
Keywords
Teacher education, professional development, Digital, media literacy, Literature, Motivation, engagement, Teacher Beliefs and Attitudes, Early Literacy, 1-Early childhood, comprehension processes, language proficiency, movements, memory, disadvantage, information, attention, media, 1ST

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Dirix, Nicolas, et al. “Reading Text When Studying in a Second Language : An Eye‐tracking Study.” READING RESEARCH QUATERLY, 2020.
APA
Dirix, N., Vander Beken, H., De Bruyne, E., Brysbaert, M., & Duyck, W. (2020). Reading text when studying in a second language : an eye‐tracking study. READING RESEARCH QUATERLY.
Chicago author-date
Dirix, Nicolas, Heleen Vander Beken, Ellen De Bruyne, Marc Brysbaert, and Wouter Duyck. 2020. “Reading Text When Studying in a Second Language : An Eye‐tracking Study.” READING RESEARCH QUATERLY.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Dirix, Nicolas, Heleen Vander Beken, Ellen De Bruyne, Marc Brysbaert, and Wouter Duyck. 2020. “Reading Text When Studying in a Second Language : An Eye‐tracking Study.” READING RESEARCH QUATERLY.
Vancouver
1.
Dirix N, Vander Beken H, De Bruyne E, Brysbaert M, Duyck W. Reading text when studying in a second language : an eye‐tracking study. READING RESEARCH QUATERLY. 2020;
IEEE
[1]
N. Dirix, H. Vander Beken, E. De Bruyne, M. Brysbaert, and W. Duyck, “Reading text when studying in a second language : an eye‐tracking study,” READING RESEARCH QUATERLY, 2020.
@article{8634111,
  abstract     = {The authors investigated how eye movements are influenced by different reading goals in participants' first (L1) and second language (L2). Participants read or studied the contents of texts while their eye movements were recorded. One group was asked to read L1 and L2 texts as they would read any expository text (informational reading). Another group was asked to study L1 and L2 texts for subsequent tests involving true/false questions (study condition). After reading, all participants, including those in the informational reading condition, completed the true/false tests without being able to further consult the texts, which allowed the authors to investigate the extent to which reading goal and text language affect recognition memory for texts. In general, more reading time was spent on studying than on informational reading, which also resulted in higher test scores in the study condition. The L2-processing cost was larger in the study condition than in the informational reading condition: Participants needed approximately 20% more time to study L2 texts. The results of various eye movement measures suggest that this is caused by slower word recognition processes and a smaller amount of information that can be processed simultaneously in L2. This was true not only for the first reading of the text but also for the rereadings in the study condition. Interestingly, the additional time for L2 studying seemed to compensate for the less efficient processing, as the recognition test scores were the same in L2 as in L1.},
  author       = {Dirix, Nicolas and Vander Beken, Heleen and De Bruyne, Ellen and Brysbaert, Marc and Duyck, Wouter},
  issn         = {0034-0553},
  journal      = {READING RESEARCH QUATERLY},
  keywords     = {Teacher education,professional development,Digital,media literacy,Literature,Motivation,engagement,Teacher Beliefs and Attitudes,Early Literacy,1-Early childhood,comprehension processes,language proficiency,movements,memory,disadvantage,information,attention,media,1ST},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {27},
  title        = {Reading text when studying in a second language : an eye‐tracking study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rrq.277},
  year         = {2020},
}

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