Advanced search
1 file | 330.72 KB Add to list

How operations matters in healthcare standardization

Author
Organization
Abstract
Purpose Process management approaches all pursue standardization, of which evidence-based medicine (EBM) is the most common form in healthcare. While EBM addresses improvement in clinical performance, it is unclear whether EBM also enhances operational performance. Conversely, operational process standardization (OPS) does not necessarily yield better clinical performance. The authors have therefore looked at the relationship between clinical practise standardization (CPS) and OPS and the way in which they jointly affect operational performance. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted a comparative case study analysis of a cataract surgery treatment at five Belgium hospital sites. Data collection involved 218 h of observations of 274 cataract surgeries. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used. Findings Findings suggest that CPS does not automatically lead to improved resource or throughput efficiency. This can be explained by the low level of OPS across the five units, notwithstanding CPS. The results indicate that a wide range of variables on different levels (patient, physician and organization) affect OPS. Research limitations/implications - Considering one type of care treatment in which clinical outcome variations are small complicates translating the findings to unstructured and complex care treatments. Originality/value With the introduction of OPS as a complementary view of CPS, the study clearly shows the potential of OPS to support CPS in practice. Operations matters in healthcare standardization, but only when it is managed in a deliberate way on a hospital and policy level.
Keywords
Process management, Standardization, Cataract surgery, Healthcare sector, Multilevel analysis, LEAN THINKING, 6 SIGMA, QUALITY, MANAGEMENT, EFFICIENCY, DELIVERY, SURGERY, DESIGN, IMPACT, GUIDELINES

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 330.72 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
De Regge, Melissa, et al. “How Operations Matters in Healthcare Standardization.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT, vol. 39, no. 9/10, 2019, pp. 1144–65.
APA
De Regge, M., Gemmel, P., & Meijboom, B. (2019). How operations matters in healthcare standardization. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT, 39(9/10), 1144–1165.
Chicago author-date
De Regge, Melissa, Paul Gemmel, and Bert Meijboom. 2019. “How Operations Matters in Healthcare Standardization.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 39 (9/10): 1144–65.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Regge, Melissa, Paul Gemmel, and Bert Meijboom. 2019. “How Operations Matters in Healthcare Standardization.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 39 (9/10): 1144–1165.
Vancouver
1.
De Regge M, Gemmel P, Meijboom B. How operations matters in healthcare standardization. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT. 2019;39(9/10):1144–65.
IEEE
[1]
M. De Regge, P. Gemmel, and B. Meijboom, “How operations matters in healthcare standardization,” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT, vol. 39, no. 9/10, pp. 1144–1165, 2019.
@article{8633087,
  abstract     = {Purpose Process management approaches all pursue standardization, of which evidence-based medicine (EBM) is the most common form in healthcare. While EBM addresses improvement in clinical performance, it is unclear whether EBM also enhances operational performance. Conversely, operational process standardization (OPS) does not necessarily yield better clinical performance. The authors have therefore looked at the relationship between clinical practise standardization (CPS) and OPS and the way in which they jointly affect operational performance. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted a comparative case study analysis of a cataract surgery treatment at five Belgium hospital sites. Data collection involved 218 h of observations of 274 cataract surgeries. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used. Findings Findings suggest that CPS does not automatically lead to improved resource or throughput efficiency. This can be explained by the low level of OPS across the five units, notwithstanding CPS. The results indicate that a wide range of variables on different levels (patient, physician and organization) affect OPS. Research limitations/implications - Considering one type of care treatment in which clinical outcome variations are small complicates translating the findings to unstructured and complex care treatments. Originality/value With the introduction of OPS as a complementary view of CPS, the study clearly shows the potential of OPS to support CPS in practice. Operations matters in healthcare standardization, but only when it is managed in a deliberate way on a hospital and policy level.},
  author       = {De Regge, Melissa and Gemmel, Paul and Meijboom, Bert},
  issn         = {0144-3577},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT},
  keywords     = {Process management,Standardization,Cataract surgery,Healthcare sector,Multilevel analysis,LEAN THINKING,6 SIGMA,QUALITY,MANAGEMENT,EFFICIENCY,DELIVERY,SURGERY,DESIGN,IMPACT,GUIDELINES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9/10},
  pages        = {1144--1165},
  title        = {How operations matters in healthcare standardization},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJOPM-03-2019-0227},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2019},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: