Advanced search
1 file | 499.24 KB Add to list

Phenotype and risk burden of sleep apnea : a population-based cohort study

Fre Bauters (UGent) , Katrien Hertegonne (UGent) , Marc De Buyzere (UGent) , Guy Joos (UGent) , Julio Chirinos Medina (UGent) and Ernst Rietzschel (UGent)
(2019) HYPERTENSION. 74(4). p.1052-1062
Author
Organization
Abstract
Sleep apnea (SA) prevalence had increased. The socioeconomic burden is significant because of healthcare-related costs and adverse outcome, especially in moderate-to-severe SA. However, the population impact is unclear, particularly for mild SA. We aimed to assess the current prevalence and the cardiovascular risk associates of SA in the general population. We performed home polygraphy and extensive clinical, sociodemographic, and cardiovascular assessment in 2205 eligible subjects from a population-based cohort. Successful polygraphy was obtained in 1809 subjects (mean age, 56.0; SD, 5.9 years; 52.3% women). The prevalence was 41.0%, 11.8%, and 6.5% for mild, moderate, and severe SA in men and 26.6%, 4.4%, and 1.2% in women. Male sex, age, increasing BMI, and snoring were independently associated with SA, whereas sleepiness or tiredness were not. Compared with those without SA, mild SA was associated with (age- and sex-adjusted OR; 95% CI): diabetes mellitus (2.40; 1.52-3.80), hypertension (1.76; 1.42-2.19), left ventricular hypertrophy (1.36; 1.03-1.79), arterial plaques (1.19; 0.94-1.52), and increased IL-6 (interleukin-6) levels (1.37; 1.10-1.72). These associations were more pronounced in moderate-to-severe SA. To conclude, SA is highly prevalent in the middle-aged general population. It is largely undetected and undetectable using a symptom-based strategy. Yet, even the large group with mild SA shows a manifestly higher metabolic, inflammatory, and cardiovascular risk factor burden, with potential public health implications.
Keywords
diabetes mellitus, epidemiology, hypertension, obesity, prevalence, sleep apnea, GENERAL-POPULATION, PREVALENCE, APNEALINK(TM), DIAGNOSIS, HYPOPNEA, DISEASE, ADULTS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 499.24 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Bauters, Fre, et al. “Phenotype and Risk Burden of Sleep Apnea : A Population-Based Cohort Study.” HYPERTENSION, vol. 74, no. 4, 2019, pp. 1052–62.
APA
Bauters, F., Hertegonne, K., De Buyzere, M., Joos, G., Chirinos Medina, J., & Rietzschel, E. (2019). Phenotype and risk burden of sleep apnea : a population-based cohort study. HYPERTENSION, 74(4), 1052–1062.
Chicago author-date
Bauters, Fre, Katrien Hertegonne, Marc De Buyzere, Guy Joos, Julio Chirinos Medina, and Ernst Rietzschel. 2019. “Phenotype and Risk Burden of Sleep Apnea : A Population-Based Cohort Study.” HYPERTENSION 74 (4): 1052–62.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Bauters, Fre, Katrien Hertegonne, Marc De Buyzere, Guy Joos, Julio Chirinos Medina, and Ernst Rietzschel. 2019. “Phenotype and Risk Burden of Sleep Apnea : A Population-Based Cohort Study.” HYPERTENSION 74 (4): 1052–1062.
Vancouver
1.
Bauters F, Hertegonne K, De Buyzere M, Joos G, Chirinos Medina J, Rietzschel E. Phenotype and risk burden of sleep apnea : a population-based cohort study. HYPERTENSION. 2019;74(4):1052–62.
IEEE
[1]
F. Bauters, K. Hertegonne, M. De Buyzere, G. Joos, J. Chirinos Medina, and E. Rietzschel, “Phenotype and risk burden of sleep apnea : a population-based cohort study,” HYPERTENSION, vol. 74, no. 4, pp. 1052–1062, 2019.
@article{8632642,
  abstract     = {{Sleep apnea (SA) prevalence had increased. The socioeconomic burden is significant because of healthcare-related costs and adverse outcome, especially in moderate-to-severe SA. However, the population impact is unclear, particularly for mild SA. We aimed to assess the current prevalence and the cardiovascular risk associates of SA in the general population. We performed home polygraphy and extensive clinical, sociodemographic, and cardiovascular assessment in 2205 eligible subjects from a population-based cohort. Successful polygraphy was obtained in 1809 subjects (mean age, 56.0; SD, 5.9 years; 52.3% women). The prevalence was 41.0%, 11.8%, and 6.5% for mild, moderate, and severe SA in men and 26.6%, 4.4%, and 1.2% in women. Male sex, age, increasing BMI, and snoring were independently associated with SA, whereas sleepiness or tiredness were not. Compared with those without SA, mild SA was associated with (age- and sex-adjusted OR; 95% CI): diabetes mellitus (2.40; 1.52-3.80), hypertension (1.76; 1.42-2.19), left ventricular hypertrophy (1.36; 1.03-1.79), arterial plaques (1.19; 0.94-1.52), and increased IL-6 (interleukin-6) levels (1.37; 1.10-1.72). These associations were more pronounced in moderate-to-severe SA. To conclude, SA is highly prevalent in the middle-aged general population. It is largely undetected and undetectable using a symptom-based strategy. Yet, even the large group with mild SA shows a manifestly higher metabolic, inflammatory, and cardiovascular risk factor burden, with potential public health implications.}},
  author       = {{Bauters, Fre and Hertegonne, Katrien and De Buyzere, Marc and Joos, Guy and Chirinos Medina, Julio and Rietzschel, Ernst}},
  issn         = {{0194-911X}},
  journal      = {{HYPERTENSION}},
  keywords     = {{diabetes mellitus,epidemiology,hypertension,obesity,prevalence,sleep apnea,GENERAL-POPULATION,PREVALENCE,APNEALINK(TM),DIAGNOSIS,HYPOPNEA,DISEASE,ADULTS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{4}},
  pages        = {{1052--1062}},
  title        = {{Phenotype and risk burden of sleep apnea : a population-based cohort study}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.119.13452}},
  volume       = {{74}},
  year         = {{2019}},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: